Mr. Nature: Baby Iguanas

A Handful Of Baby Iguanas Stock Photo - Download Image Now - iStock

Yes, they get an awful lot bigger than this!

Most animals are lot more complicated than we think! They are very, very far from being just “biological machines.”

Check out this article about the social lives of baby iguanas. You’ll be surprised, I guarantee it.

https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/tetrapod-zoology/amazing-social-life-of-green-iguana/

Now I already knew or suspected much of this because I had my iguana for 17 years and he most certainly did not just sit around like a paperweight. No! Because of the way he was raised, he thought he was a mammal and acted accordingly. Other pet iguanas I knew, treated like inanimate objects that had to eat once in a while, became sulky and dull. As you would, under like circumstances.

These are social animals. In the wild, baby iguanas socialize with and learn from each other–not like a solitary animal stuck in a cage. A pet iguana, if raised and treated as a pet, will be a pet. (Note: You’ve got to get them young.) Raised with dogs and cats, it will make friends with dogs and cats. When I was teaching, I sometimes brought him to school with me because the kids were crazy about him.

Animals have the same maker we have; and God took pleasure in them and pronounced them good.

We have that in common with them.

8 comments on “Mr. Nature: Baby Iguanas

  1. I never would have thought about having one of these critters as a pet, but then, what do I know?

  2. The evolutionary thinking of the mainstream posits a world where self preservation is dominant, but I’ve seen for too many examples of caring among animals to believe that animals do not have a sense of someth8ng greater than their own interests.

    1. The baby iguanas stick together after hatching, and the males protect their sisters from predators. My iguana used to protect our room from a certain cat who liked to poo on beds. He didn’t allow her to do that on my bed. But the other cat in the house, and the dog, he always made welcome.

  3. It is interesting indeed. I don’t think I ever even saw an iguana when I was young. If I had, I might have liked them.

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