Tag Archives: God’s stuff

Mr. Nature: The Amazing Colossal Giant Centipede

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Imagine a centipede that’s six feet long, maybe a little longer, and weighs a hundred pounds, and maybe more. Yipes!

Jambo, Mr. Nature here–and today our safari takes us to a tropical forest in what is now somewhere in, I guess, Oklahoma: a lot has changed since then. And there are these things crawling around through the ferns… Not really centipedes; but probably, if you saw one, you would cry out, “Eeyah! A giant centipede!”

Be of good cheer: “fossil material suggests it may have been herbivorous,” scientists have said. Uh, what if the suggestion is wrong? Not to worry–no one has seen a live Arthropleura in donkey’s years.

Why, once upon a time, were bugs so big? Some scientists believe there was more oxygen in the air than there is now. Let me point out that, where fossils of these giant bugs are found, we don’t find the fossils of gigantic birds, chameleons, or anteaters. Anyway, who knows? It’s God’s planet and He has done as He pleased, without explaining it to us. But He’s certainly left enough hints to keep us busy.

I guess the closest I’ll ever come to Arthropleura is the “giant millipede,” eight inches long, that they had in one of our local pet stores and which they let me handle: millipedes don’t bite. It was a gentle little soul, although its feet tickled. Maybe Arthropleura was peaceful and benign.

All I know is, it would take my breath away, to see one.


An Uplifting Story

This goat was unable to walk, or even to stand up. The reason for this not being obvious, the woman at this farm animals’ refuge resolved to keep helping the goat until she could finally stand, walk, and even run. The woman worked at this every day, as chronicled here in the video. Watch what happened.


Mr. Nature: The Axolotl

Cute little fellow, ain’t he? Or she–I can’t tell with axolotls.

Jambo, everybody, Mr. Nature here. Let me tell you two cool things about axolotls.

They can grow back body parts that get injured and lost–a foot, a leg, or a piece of the tail. Other salamanders can do that, too; I once saw a really big salamander that had five feet (two on one leg, where an injured foot healed but a new one grew anyway).

Even cooler, axolotls are actually baby salamanders (very closely related to the tiger salamander) which never metamorphose into the adult form so they can live on land. They remain in the water all their lives, never shed their gills, and–like a lot of college students–never grow up, even though they can reproduce. They do grow bigger as time goes on, but they never complete the ordinary salamander life cycle. Reminds me of that old saying, “You can’t stay young, but you can be immature forever.”

Axolotls are rare; they live in fresh water in and around Mexico City, and urbanization subjects their environment to high stress. There are probably more axolotls kept as pets, and captive-bred, than can be found in the wild today.

They deserve to survive–which, I think, will test the kindness, patience, and benevolence of the human race.


Sanity Break: Kittens and Bunnies

My car’s in the shop, probably for the whole week, with a monster repair bill at the end of it, it’s still raining, and… and… and–

Bunnies and kittens!

God keeps giving us these little glimpses of what He has in store for us, once He finishes repairing all the damage: and it is very, very good.

This is one of those glimpses.


Psalm 46, ‘Our Refuge and Strength’

I read this Psalm this morning–Psalm 46, “God is our refute and strength”–and I want to share it with you.

God’s providence is woven into the fiber of the physical universe, sustaining it moment by moment. But He is also the Lord of Hosts, mighty in battle: and when He intervenes in history–watch out!


They Play Like Cats & Dogs

If puppies and kittens can figure it out, why can’t human beings? It’s nice to be nice!

They’re supposed to be hereditary enemies, right? Well, obviously they know how to overcome that. And when they do, they give us a peek into the kind of Kingdom God has in store for us… in His own good time.


‘Sanity Medicine: Johnny the Octopus’ (2016)

They can also figure out how to get out of a jar.

How would an octopus know how to get at the contents of a jar with a twist-off cap? I mean, it’s not something he’s seen before, and learned how to do by watching others do it. What would happen if you let an octopus watch a lot of chess games?

https://leeduigon.com/2016/04/27/sanity-medicine-johnny-the-octopus/

Anyway, here’s some of God’s stuff to start the day–the intelligence of the octopus. God’s creation: that’s how He made them, for His own good pleasure.


Sorry, No Nooze Today

This is Good Friday, and our blog will observe it by not covering any of the nooze today. Hence the video of the baby iguana eating watercress. Aren’t they pretty little things? God’s stuff is just so good.

I’d love to raise a baby iguana again. If you do it right–and it’s easy to do it right–you wind up with a wonderful pet. If you do it wrong, you wind up with this big mean lizard who wants to bite you. A friend of mine had an iguana who bit him on the tongue. Yes, he was showing off by sticking his tongue out. Teenage boys do things like that. And the iguana bit off the tip of it. Yowch! Served him right.

But my iguana was raised right, and he never bit anybody. And if he could have purred while he sat on your lap, he would have.


Our Tulips Are Back!

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Tulips are supposed to be short-lived; but our original tulip–the tallest one in this picture–was here when we moved in, forty-plus years ago, and it’s not only still here, still beautiful, but it has three offspring.

For a few years there, we thought we were going to lose it because squirrels had decided the flowers made a nice snack. That generation of squirrels seems to have passed, and its successors haven’t shown any taste for tulips.

So the flowers bloom in the spring: God’s stuff reminding us, “God is nigh.”


Mr. Nature: Flying Snakes

Jambo, everybody, Mr. Nature here. And today we’re off in search of flying snakes.

Once upon a time, people believed that Arabia bred flying snakes which would sometimes migrate to populated areas and become a deadly plague. Herodotus wrote all about it–and was pooh-poohed by later generations.

But in real life, Indonesia is home to the paradise tree snake–a snake which glides through the air from tree to tree. So maybe Herodotus wasn’t as all wet as everybody thought. (Hint: He usually turns out not to be!)

Ah! you say. But what does a flying serpent hunt?

You’re gonna love this.

Flying lizards!

God’s stuff–cooler than we ever would have thought of.


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