Tag Archives: God’s stuff

Mr. Nature: The Walking Worm

It’s not a worm, it’s not an insect–in fact, scientists still don’t know what it is for sure.

Presenting the Peripatus, aka the Velvet Worm, aka the Walking Worm. There are many species living throughout the Southern Hemisphere and around the Equator. They’re small, they come out mostly at night, and they creep around the leaf litter–so they aren’t often seen.

Jambo! This is Mr. Nature, with more of God’s stuff. We have plenty of fossils of various walking worms, and those look just like the worms we have today. They’ve had all that time–half a billion years! say the Darwinists–to evolve into Gender Studies professors, and look at ’em: they’re still walking worms.

Well, heck–they’re good at being walking worms, they’ve got it down to a science. Some species lay eggs, some bear live young. They all eat small insects, spraying a sticky good onto their prey to immobilize it. They are as God created them. They have no power to harm us in any way, and they look cool. Fascinating little creatures.


Looking Forward to Supper

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I can’t seem to wrap my brain around anything today. I turn to nooze sites and there’s nothing but more sham “impeachment” stories; and if I don’t want to write about those, there’s the endless parade of inanities trotted out as “education.” I’m tired of writing about that, too.

Patty is going to make us pork soup for supper, with noodles, onion, carrots, and celery. I find that rather more appealing than the nooze.

Food is a gift from God, to be received and enjoyed with thankfulness. He really does provide for us, you know: we wouldn’t last a day without Him.

I pray I’ll be more up to snuff tomorrow. A good supper is surely a step in the right direction.


Mr. Nature: Mosasaurus

The Komodo dragon of Indonesia is, as Bob and Ray observed, the world’s largest living lizard. Full-grown at ten feet long and 300 pounds, occasionally it eats… people.

Some thousands of years ago, certain monitor lizards in Australia grew to be twice the size of a Komodo dragon. But they were pipsqueaks compared to the Mosasaurus of the Cretaceous Period (or whenever–we don’t want to take such things too seriously).

As you can see in this clip from Jurassic World, the Mosasaur was very, very big–up to thirty or even forty feet long, depending on the species. Mosasaurs are all the rage in dinosaur movies today, and of course their size is exaggerated therein. Closely related to today’s monitor lizards, the Mosasaur was likely the supreme predator of its time. Instead of legs it had flippers, so it had to stay in the water. And no, it was not as big as a New Jersey township.

What hath God wrought? We can only marvel at the scanty remains of these gigantic creatures that are no longer with us. Where they are now, only the God who made them knows. But maybe someday He will tell us.


How *Big* Did Dinosaurs Get?

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Awesome and mighty are the works of your hands, O Lord!

See that tiny red dot under the dinosaur? It’s an adult human being. By comparison, the dinosaur, Amphiceolias, would have been like a walking apartment building.

So many new discoveries are being made in dinosaur paleontology these days, I can hardly keep up with them–and I do try. Now that scientists are looking in places where they haven’t looked before, in South America and Asia, they’re always finding new ones. And one of the themes of those discoveries is “bigger and bigger and bigger!”

These animals, as living things, are virtually unimaginable. There’s just nothing like them anymore. What would it be like, to see one? The earth must have shaken when they walked. And how much did they have to eat, to support such bulk? When I was a boy, the Brontosaurus was acclaimed the biggest dinosaur. But these new ones would have made one of those look like a baby.

Just contemplating these animals ought to make us feel humble. There may even have been creatures that were bigger, much bigger, than these that take our breath away. Was there, after all, no limit to how big they could grow? What must their world have been like?

Awesome and mighty are His works.


Mr. Nature: The Hummingbird Moth

Jambo, Mr. Nature here–and would you believe it? I have never seen a hummingbird. I’ve never seen a hummingbird moth, either, so I can’t say how much they resemble one another.

But watch this moth. Like  hummingbird, it can fly backwards. I’ve never seen a moth or butterfly do that. It can also hover as it sucks nectar from a flower.

How can two creatures so widely unrelated be so similar to one another? Attributing this to evolution based on blind chance and environmental opportunities seems like a real stretcher to me.

God’s stuff–it does give us a lot to think about.


Now I’ve Seen Everything (Cats & Birds)

Another little peek at what the restored Creation will look like, when the Creator is finished with it.

Cat napping with one, two,three… four parakeets.

A crow patiently feeding a cat and a dog, morsel by morsel. I know crows are smart, but holy moly–!

And a cockatiel guarding a sleeping cat.


We’ve Got Honeybees

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Enough of nooze, enough of politics: let’s look at some of God’s stuff instead. In this case, I only have to look out my living room window.

Because my wife has been so sick–she’s getting better now, praise God: and thank you all for your prayers, the Lord has heard them–we didn’t have a garden this year. We let our little garden plot grow wild, and by the end of the summer, had a lush growth of wonderful little white flowers. Queen Anne’s lace, they’re called.

And the bees just love ’em! Early in the morning, the bumblebees are already at work. Then come the little native bees. And a little later, hallelujah–honeybees!

We hear that honeybees are in trouble everywhere–disease and habitat destruction being the chief culprits. For a while there we weren’t seeing any honeybees at all. But wherever their hive is (we don’t know), the tiny white flowers of the Queen Anne’s Lace are bringing them here. Once the day warms up a little, we’ve always got honeybees. And it pleases us to think we’ve got something that they like–flowers that we never planted, but that God has provided.

Thank you for that, O Father!


All About Those Weird Knuckle-Bears

Here’s everything you ever wanted to know about those strange animals called “knuckle-bears” (because they walk on their knuckles)–plus some stuff that you can just ignore, about evolution and jillions of years, etc.

These were once found all over the world, but now they’re supposed to be extinct. If you read Bell Mountain, you know they’ve reappeared in Lintum Forest, venturing out at night and silently returning in the stillness of the dawn. Not even Helki knows where they sleep and bear their young.

It seems the Lord Our God was particularly creative when He made these. What are they? They seem to be a jumble of all these other animals–horses, bears, gorillas, tapirs, rhinos, and sloths… Don’t believe anyone who says Science has nailed down the chalicotheres’ place in the animal kingdom.

If you’re one of the few who’ve been to Lintum Forest and actually seen the knuckle-bears, you won’t even try to pin them down.


From Caterpillar to Butterfly

More nooze? Nah! Let’s turn to some of God’s stuff, instead.

Mr. Nature here, along with a Monarch butterfly caterpillar who’s ready to metamorphose into a butterfly. It’s been speeded up so we can watch it.

How did the Creator ever think of this? We stand in awe.

The Monarch is one of my favorite butterflies. Because the caterpillars eat milkweed, birds and animals can’t eat them without getting sick. The end product is… beauty.

Praise the Lord for His wonderful works.


Memory Lane: Red Salamanders

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Isn’t this just beautiful? The red salander, Pseudotriton ruber ruber–when I was a boy, you could find them in my neighborhood. That was before the political party that claims to be “for” the environment paved everything over.

My friends and I collected salamanders. The most common were the little redbacks. They were just about everywhere. But every now and then you’d find a red salamander–bright red, speckled with black, with a salmon-pink underbelly. Like living jewels.

I still look for salamanders, occasionally, but the only ones left are redbacks. There are no more gorgeous red salamanders around here. They had to go, to make way for nail salons and trendy restaurants. And now, high rise tenements. Makes our town more urban, dontcha know.

In the restitution of all things we shall see Creation as the Lord Our God created it. And I’m sure He won’t forget to include these salamanders.


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