Tag Archives: classic hymns

Encore, ‘He Hideth My Soul’

This is just one of the eight or nine thousand hymns Fanny Crosby wrote: He Hideth My Soul, sung here by Nathan and Lyle with family and friends, in Denton County, Texas. Relax and let it sing to you.


‘Yield Not to Temptation’

This hymn, Yield Not to Temptation, was always a Sunday school standby. Nathan on the Mandolin, Lyle on guitar–from Denton County, Texas. And if you’ve got a guitar handy, they give you the chords so you can strum along.

Make a joyful noise unto the Lord.


Encore, ‘Christ Shall Have Dominion’

The first time I ever posted this hymn, Christ Shall Have Dominion, there was an objection to it–as if they objector had someone else in mine whom he would rather had dominion over land and sea. I just didn’t have it in me to ask who that would be.

There is only one rightful and lawful King of Kings and Lord of Lords, and His name is Jesus Christ.


‘How Firm a Foundation’

In the Dutch Reformed Church in which I was raised, we sang this hymn to the melody of O Come All Ye Faithful. Then it was like getting an extra Christmas. But try as I might, I just can’t find any melody for How Firm a Foundation other than the one used here.

I think our hymnal said this was originally an old Portuguese hymn, but maybe my memory’s at fault. Be that as it may, give God the glory.


Bonus Hymn, ‘To God Be the Glory’

I had a desire for this hymn, this evening: To God Be the Glory. I don’t know who’s performing it here, but it sounds like an old-fashioned church congregation singing to the accompaniment of a piano… played by a lady in a hat.


By Request, ‘Christ Shall Have Dominion’

Susan asked for this one: Christ Shall Have Dominion. If It sounds like Onward, Christian Soldiers, it’s because both lyrics use the same melody by Arthur S. Sullivan of Gilbert & Sullivan fame, published in 1871. It doesn’t have to be fancy–three friends, a guitar, and a couple of hymnals will do the trick.

The first time I posted this hymn, somebody complained. I replied, “Well, then, who would you rather have dominion, other than Jesus Christ?” I never got an answer.


‘O Come, O Come, Emmanuel’

This Christmas hymn comes to us from the 12th century, when it was sung in Latin. Emmanuel, the Bible tells us, means “God with us.” And how we need Him with us!

O Lord Our God! Bless this Christmas season, and give it power to bring us back to Jesus Christ our only Savior. Amen.


By Request, ‘The Holly and the Ivy’

Phoebe asked for this one, The Holly and the Ivy; and let’s go first-class, with the Norwich Cathedral Choir.

I didn’t recognize the hymn at first. Like so many other really old hymns, The Holly and the Ivy comes attached to several very different melodies. Which means, folks, you can with a clear conscience ask for it again, and it’ll sound totally different!


By Request, ‘Before the Throne of God Above’

J.S. Klingemann requested this hymn, Before the Throne of God Above, performed as a Celtic piano solo with God’s own seashore for a background. I’ve never heard this hymn before. It’s haunting, it’s lovely; it stirs my soul. Thank you, J.S., for requesting it.


‘Christ for the World We Sing’

We’re waiting for readers to submit hymn requests, but so far today, this is the hymn that’s with me–Christ for the World We Sing, here performed by the Sanctuary Choir at the First United Methodist Church in Houston. Note the father with his little girls: God’s stuff. And it always works.

And don’t forget, everybody, I’m also taking requests for Christmas music.


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