Survey: We’re So Bored!

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So… American adults are “mired in boredom” 131 days a year, says a survey sponsored by (I kid you not) Bowlero bowling alleys (https://www.studyfinds.org/no-fun-americans-mired-boredom-131-days-year/).

A boring day is defined as one which is “simply no fun at all.” Click the article if you want to see the math. Only that might be boring.

Sixty percent of the 2,000 adults surveyed said “life is just too grown-up”: what with work, raising a family, carrying out responsibilities, etc. And “entertainment”–movies, for instance, or a ball game–costs way too much. And there’s always the chance you might spend a lot of money on a boring movie. Then you’d be bored and broke.

Dude… the kingdom of Boredom is within you.

Face it–a lot of people are bored because they have no idea how not to be. They don’t know how to make their own fun. They don’t know how to be grateful for simple, necessary things that ought to please them: like food, for instance, or the beauties of nature (provided Democrats haven’t paved them over and replaced wildflowers with nail salons). They don’t understand that you can turn the nooze off whenever you want. They don’t know how to please each other: just sit around waiting for someone to please them.

From kindergarten on up, they’re spoon-fed, every day–and suddenly, when you’re too far into adulthood to turn back, the spoon-feeding stops. And you don’t know how to feed yourself.

And heck, you can always visit my blog…

10 comments on “Survey: We’re So Bored!

  1. My mother used to say that people who are wrapped up in themselves make very small packages.

  2. Good one, Valerie. I don’t think I ever heard that before, but I sure see the logic.

    1. I was writing about this in the 1970s–spoon-feeding kids everything, but everything… and then just stopping when they finish high school or college. Suddenly the spoon is gone. Boredom is the least of their problems.

    2. I was covering a suburban township that had every kind of “program” you could possibly imagine–all of which dried up when the kids hit 15. For some obscure reason they also had a problem with delinquency and vandalism–who woulda thought it?

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