So You Think You Ought to Have a Pet Door…

And the sage said unto them, “Behold, there are old squirrels, and there are bold squirrels, but there are no old, bold squirrels.”  —Cat Wisdom of the Ages

I’ve often wondered why, if you have a pet door that lets your cat or dog go out or come in, that the odd possum, skunk, or squirrel doesn’t come in, too. You’d think it’d because to invade a house full of cats or dogs would be, well, suicidal. But watch this freakin’ squirrel try again and again to get into the house through the pet door–with the cat standing right there in plain sight! I would love to ask that squirrel what the dickens he was thinking.

P.S.–Our mayor just called to tell us that a state of emergency has been declared in advance of the predicted big-mama snowstorm. I don’t know if there’s any penalty for declaring a state of emergency and then nothing happens. Well, we shall see.

About leeduigon

I have lived in Metuchen, NJ, all my life. I have been married to my wife Patricia since 1977. I am a former newspaper editor and reporter. I was also the owner-operator of my own small business for several years. I wrote various novels and short stories published during 1980s and 1990s. I am a long-time student of judo and Japanese swordsmanship (kenjutsu). I also play chess, basketball, and military and sports simulations. View all posts by leeduigon

20 responses to “So You Think You Ought to Have a Pet Door…

  • UnKnowable

    Squirrels can be pretty fearless at times. Shoot, I wouldn’t want to enter a house if there was a cat in there determined to prevent it from happening.

    Keep us posted on the weather situation.

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  • Linda Sorci

    It looked to me like the cat was trying to let the squirrel in! lol

    Just having recovered power two days ago after having lost it for 3 frigid days with no heat (temps in the 20s), we’re also in the path of this predicted snow dump. So, my first prayer is that we don’t lose power again; my second is that the predictors are wrong and none of us get hit with what they seem to think we will.

    As for a pet door, I’ve heard horror stories about raccoons, possums and various other small but wild critters entering. It only makes sense – and makes even more sense not to have one in the first place 🙂

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  • UnKnowable

    Imagine having a pet door in a place where the wildlife includes Diamondback Rattlesnakes and Gila Monsters. Amazingly, some people here still have them.

    Sorry to hear about your power loss, Linda. I hope the next wave of this storm in less intense.

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    • leeduigon

      Snakes get into my brother’s house all the time. Happily, they’re only rat snakes, and they’re hunting mice. You can hear them thumping away in the attack as they subdue their prey.

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    • Linda Sorci

      Thank you, Unknowable. My poor old body got so cold I had terrible cramps for about 24 hours. It’s rough when that happens in winter. During hurricane season in South Florida it’s much easier to go without power. I’d much rather it be warm than so very cold. Once we lost power during a hurricane and it was out for 17 days. Our generator helped with essentials. This time, the generator didn’t start and it went to the repair shop – they found a mouse nest in it lol.

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      • UnKnowable

        You should have captured the mice and made them earn their room and board by running on a wheel attached to a generator. Problem solved! 🙂

        17 days without electricity has to be pretty rough. A lot of people don’t realize how dependent we are upon electricity.

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        • Linda Sorci

          LOL! What a great idea! But I think the mice had already evacuated.

          The 17 days was in 90-95 degree heat – but that was soooo much better than 20 degrees for 3 days. I much prefer losing power in South Florida rather than way up in Western New York.

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          • UnKnowable

            I do pretty well as long as the temp is below 105 F. When it gets to 110-115, it really is hard to do much more than seek shade. But that’s Arizona heat which is drier than Florida’s heat.

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          • Linda Sorci

            My brother lived in Mesa for a number of years. Now he’s in Alabama 🙂 The humidity in Florida is what most people can’t tolerate. I guess I’m the oddball.

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  • UnKnowable

    I don’t think I’d like that, but at least they are harmless.

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  • Erlene

    I know how it goes with unexpected inconveniences. We were without power last winter, luckily had a working generator, and spare gas heater, but it was still a worry, and now the ground all around here is saturated with water from all the snow and rain, so the septic system filled, had to be pumped, and pretty soon filled again. sighhh
    I will pray for you, Linda. Hope you have lots of warm clothes and blankets.

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    • Linda Sorci

      Thank you, Erlene. You and your family remain in my prayers too. I do hope your son’s shoulder resolves.

      It’s easy to take for granted things like electricity and all that comes with it in this age of indoor plumbing lol.

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      • UnKnowable

        I’ve had it easy, central heat, running water, indoor plumbing, etc. all my life. We were never rich, but we had things pretty good, compared to many a person.

        We once visited a relative that had a pump and and outhouse. I thought it an adventure, but I don’t know that I would have retained my enthusiasm were it an everyday thing.

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        • Linda Sorci

          When I was a young girl, we lived with my aunt and uncle on a farm. We had an outdoor well, complete with the bucket on a rope, and an outhouse. The outhouse was pretty scary at night! It wasn’t long before my uncle built us a bigger, better house with indoor plumbing 🙂

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          • leeduigon

            One of my earliest memories is of a hurricane that wrecked Grandpa’s outhouse. I still remember him and my father piling up the broken boards. But they weren’t using it anymore, having switched to indoor plumbing.

            Here in this part of NJ, at least during my whole lifetime, everyone always had all the modern conveniences. When Hurricane Sandy knocked out our electric power for the better part of a week, that was terribly annoying–but I’m sure you’ve been through worse.

            King Cyrus once remarked, “Soft living breeds soft men.” We’re all a bunch of cream puffs in New Jersey.

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          • Linda Sorci

            Indeed. We’ve been through quite a number of hurricanes – not the least of which was Andrew in ’92. Andrew was a category 5. And once, we had one – I think it was Jeanne – that came through, hit us on the east coast, headed for the gulf coast, turned around, came back and hit us again! Incredible! Still, The Lord protected us. We never sustained anything but minimal damage. Even my roof could have been repaired, but the adjuster was kind enough to submit a replacement recommendation.

            And even with that, I still prefer to lose power in the hot climate 🙂

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  • UnKnowable

    I think we are all cream puffs, in the context of history. Just look at the people you see in movie Westerns, no amenities, no running water, but they always look like they just got out of a makeup chair. 🙂

    Like

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