The Amazing Mind… of a Cat

In this extraordinary video, the human pretends there’s an obstruction in the doorway and he has to jump over it. This is keenly observed by the cat. And watch what happens! I can’t even begin to assess the cat’s mental processes–they must be mighty complicated.

P.S.–Hey, everybody, this blog is slow, slow, slow today, viewership way down. But if y’all give me a bunch more views, I’ll give you another animal video at its usual time this evening, EST. Okay, I’ll probably do it anyway. That’s just the kinda guy I am.

About leeduigon

I have lived in Metuchen, NJ, all my life. I have been married to my wife Patricia since 1977. I am a former newspaper editor and reporter. I was also the owner-operator of my own small business for several years. I wrote various novels and short stories published during 1980s and 1990s. I am a long-time student of judo and Japanese swordsmanship (kenjutsu). I also play chess, basketball, and military and sports simulations. View all posts by leeduigon

4 responses to “The Amazing Mind… of a Cat

  • Unknowable

    There’s a study in animal psychology, right before our eyes. I’m not sure what it means, but I am 100% certain it means something. If nothing else, it means that the cat was paying attention and taking cues from its pet human. 🙂

    Like

  • Erlene Talbott

    This is amazing. This cat is really a thinker. Seems it trusts the judgement of the human more than its own instincts or judgements. Sure makes you wonder.

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    • Unknowable

      I would see this as evidence that cats are made to be companions to humans. I saw a documentary once about animal behavior and how it varies between wild and domestic animals.

      They showed a chimp, which is supposedly the closest to being human (note that I said supposedly) and showed that it did not pay attention to humans very well. Then they repeated the experiment with a dog, which took its cues from the human, including looking in the direction the human pointed. Obviously, the dog’s instincts were to pay attention to humans.

      Next, they showed some wolves which had been raised by humans from an early age. At first, they were like puppies and a lot of fun. Somewhere before being six months old, some wild animal instincts kicked in and they became difficult to manage, even forcibly taking food off the human’s plates. They were somewhat tamed by being raised with humans, but they were still very much wild animals and not truly docile.

      Chimps, BTW, are very intelligent and capable of learning a great deal, but they are still wild animals, unpredictable at best, and potentially quite dangerous. Much like the situation with wolves, they are docile until they begin to mature and then they can become quite nasty.

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  • Erlene Talbott

    That is interesting. It reminded me of a dog (hunting dog) that my late husband had. I had the table set for dinner, a roast and other things, and the dog came in, grabbed the roast off the platter and took off with it. She was otherwise a friendly, docile animal and was well fed, but that was one time she acted wild.

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