Ye Olde Fox Hunt (‘Oy, Rodney’)

silly romance novels – Lee Duigon

A letter from reader Ambrose Twidgeon in Babbo Township, Pellucidar, has served as a timely reminder to the Queen of Suspense, Violet Crepuscular.

“Dear Ms. Crepuscular,” the letter reads, “what ever happened to the traditional olde English fox hunt in Scurveyshire? How can you write about English country life without the fox hunt? I am so upset with you, I had to break my model airplanes!”

Ms. Crepuscular’s reply is found in her introduction to Chapter CDLXXXVIII of her epic romance, Oy, Rodney.

“As a matter of fact,” she trombolizes, “I was just about to write about the fox hunt when Mr. Twidgeon’s letter arrived. Really, I do not need any guidance in writing romance novels! Let me offer this friendly reminder to Mr. Twidgeon: Get lost!”

The hereditary master of the Scurveyshire Hunt is Lady Margo Cargo, who inherited it from her father along with a persistent halitosis. She can’t ride a horse, so she leads the hunt in a golf cart driven by a condemned prisoner. No fox has been caught since Lady Margo took over.

(What about the Scurveyshire Fair, Violet? And the vicar’s backyard wading pool?)

“If I get any more friendly reminders from ignoramuses who think they know how I should write my novels, I am very much afraid that I shall lose my temper,” Ms. Crepuscular writes. So vanishes all hope of finding out about the fair and the wading pool. She’s in one of her moods.

The chapter ends without the fox hunt actually starting.

4 comments on “Ye Olde Fox Hunt (‘Oy, Rodney’)

  1. Trombolize, hmm? I like trombolize. But it sounds as though Violet is building up some blood clots instead of breaking them down. (Yes, I looked it up, but I had to translate it from Turkish or some Slavic language. Ms. Crepuscular certainly gets around!)

    1. I think that trombolizing may be Violet’s greatest claim to fame.

      Had there been an actual fox hunt, I’m pretty sure that I would have died of psychic shock. 🙂

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