An End to Social Media Censorship?

Censoring social media over hunting photos is utterly absurd ...

Many of you here on this blog, including me, have been censored by the social media, and it’s always been a one-way street: censorship for us, a free pass for Far Left Crazy.

But an end to that may be in sight.

President Donald Trump says he’s going to sign an executive order against the social media “selectively censoring news,” and defend free speech against “the unchecked power” of Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, and the rest (https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2020/05/28/donald-trump-signs-exec-order-to-curb-big-techs-unchecked-power/).

Section 230 of the act which exempts the social media from being held liable for any damages incurred because of the content that they post, the Communications Decency Act, does not allow the social media to make “editorial decisions” regarding users’ content. But in recent years, the president said, the social media have disregarded that regulation and become, he said, “nothing more than a political activism group.”

Attorney General William Barr is preparing legislation to put an end to social media censorship.

It’s about time.

Somehow it’s only conservative opinion that ends up getting banned as “hate speech,” only conservative websites that wind up getting shut down or temporarily silenced. We all wanted an Internet that was free of censorship, but we haven’t got it. If the proposed regulations get signed into law, Big Tech will have only itself to thank.

The social media have evolved into a resource used by everyone, but everyone doesn’t get the same treatment. We are not generally in favor of inventing new regulations, but the situation with the social media has gotten out of hand. I shouldn’t have to use a picture of happy puppies every time I want to discuss something deemed controversial. If I don’t, Facebook censors me.

The former Sandinista who’s now the mayor of New York said, not long ago, that if he had his druthers, “Government would determine your day-to-day reality.”

Not on President Trump’s watch, sunshine.

About leeduigon

I have lived in Metuchen, NJ, all my life. I have been married to my wife Patricia since 1977. I am a former newspaper editor and reporter. I was also the owner-operator of my own small business for several years. I wrote various novels and short stories published during 1980s and 1990s. I am a long-time student of judo and Japanese swordsmanship (kenjutsu). I also play chess, basketball, and military and sports simulations. View all posts by leeduigon

5 responses to “An End to Social Media Censorship?

  • unknowable2

    Social media, such as Facebook and Twitter, serves a real purpose, but there is a downside. Over and over, I hear of censorship, posts attacking others for not promoting PC views and all sorts of other problems. These sites have their uses, but I think that people forget that your words serve you, until they leave your mouth, at which time the tables turn, and you become a slave to whatever you’ve said. So these sites operate without decorum or restraint and the problems compound.

    Actually, I’m surprised that sites such as Facebook have remained popular for as long as they have. I understand it for promotional purposes, but spilling your every emotion to strangers is no more wise online than it is face-to-face.

  • Erlene Talbott

    Good point, unknowable. I am getting more and more bored and ready to quit facebook. The main reason I go there is to see my kids and grandkids remarks (some of which I don’t care for), and to see the pics of the great grandkids. As for twitter, I have never once visited that one.

    • unknowable2

      Everyone I know that uses Facebook to any degree tells me of battles which occur. A friend was all but mobbed for supporting Donald Trump. Another friend has posted some scriptures and commented on current events and has been accused of being racist and hateful. I’ve known this man nearly 50 years and know that this isn’t any part of his personality. This list goes on, but the bottom line is that Facebook seems to bring out controversy, even among friends and family.

      We don’t need Facebook, in any sense of the word. People can email photos, communicate with email and, the last time I checked, the telephone system still works just fine. We don’t need this … thing, which permanently records what we write down, makes us declare who is and who is not a “friend” and invades our peace of mind with notifications.

      I’m at odds with anything which places demands upon my time and my attention. If the phone rings because of a problem at work, that’s one matter; I’m paid to take that call. But if I get a notification every time someone I know posts some meaningless drivel on a Social Media forum, I find that intrusive. We lived without this for millennia, I don’t see why we need it now.

  • Erlene Talbott

    I agree. More and more, I am finding it more of a nuisance than positive.

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