Werner von Braun… on Judgment

[Thanks to Susan for the tip]

When I was in my tweens, Werner von Braun was a household name, the man who ran our space program. He and his team put a man on the moon, eventually. He was surely the most famous scientist in America.

This recently rediscovered video clip shows another side of Werner von Braun. “Everything science has taught me,” he said, led him to believe in the eternal existence of the soul–and “judgment of each one dead.” God’s judgment.

There are still scientists who believe that. But imagine if a Big Name in science ever said a thing like this in public. There’d be wailing and gnashing of teeth. They’d be howling for his scalp. (And if you have to ask who “they” are–well, then go and find out.)

Werner and his team put a man on the moon using slide rules, pen protectors in the pockets of their white shirts, and their brains. Today many of us don’t know what a slide rule was. And it’s been a long time since anyone walked on the moon.

11 comments on “Werner von Braun… on Judgment

  1. We never went to the moon. All a sham. Don Pettit, actornot, “I’d go to the moon in a nanosecond – the problem is that we don’t have the technology to do that anymore. We used to, but we destroyed that technology and it’s a painful process to build it back again.” Everything we’ve been told is a lie. William Casey, former CIA director said “We’ll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believes is false.” Shortly after he ‘died’ of a brain tumor. Werner Von Braun’s grave stone. Psalms 19:1 in KJV ” The heavens declare the glory of God; and the firmament sheweth his handywork.” Check out Carol Rosin and Wernher Von Braun.

    1. Reba, you are so correct. I have seen that clip, plus numerous others while researching this. Many are waking up to this deception and lie. Among other things, NASA has stated, that they lost most or all the film footage. If you watch the videos by NASA, every once in a while you will see bubbles, while they are supposedly in space. Those shots are filmed underwater.

      Who filmed Neil Armstrong taking his “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind” stroll on the moon?

      Have you seen the Moon landing cut scenes filmed in the Nevada Desert yet? Check it out.

      Wikileaks releases Moon landing cut scenes filmed in Nevada Desert | Christian Flat Earth Ministry

      https://christianflatearthministry.org/2022/09/03/wikileaks-releases-moon-landing-cut-scenes-filmed-in-nevada-desert/

  2. On Braun is an interesting study, in and of himself. His activities during the war are rightfully scrutinized, and opinions vary as to his degree of loyalty to an evil cause. In any event, he secreted away documentation on the V1 program and sought the Americans so that he could surrender.

    I have heard interviews where he stated that America appealed to him, because it was a Christian nation, and I’ll take him at his word. From the clip above, I get the impression that he felt he was at peace with God, and I appreciate his words.

    Few scientists in our day would speak out in this manner.

    1. I believe the rocket is going up. Into space, to the moon, and back? I do not believe that.

      I watched the movie “Gravity”. It really looked like they were in space, didn’t it? It was filmed in a movie studio. Green screens work very well. NASA has a budget of millions of dollars daily. Plenty of money to fake whatever they want.

      I believe all or most Astro-nots were Masons. A bit strange, it seems to me.

      What do large ships and submarines have on board? Lathes and milling machines, for repairing and making parts. This is indispensable and vital! Where is the repair station on the Space station? All I have ever heard of, was minor “repairs” being done, in probably the harshest conditions one can imagine (if they really could go there). No seals ever leak and need to be repaired? I worked in a machine shop. Things were always breaking and needed repairs. On the Space station, one tiny tiny leak would spell their doom. On ships and subs, there are numerous hatchways and doors that can be closed. If they were in space, one tiny hole anywhere would spell their doom. They would need an airlock to get from chamber to chamber, and they would always be closed!

    2. Indeed. You can’t keep a secret involving even a small handful of people for very long, without extraordinary measures, A conspiracy involving a half million people wouldn’t last a day.

      I’ve known people that worked on the space program. An uncle was involved in a small way on Project Gemini. A friend worked on the aluminum boxes used in tne collection of moon rocks.

      Indeed, tiny leaks could doom a mission, but the same can be said for the airline flights which happen in the thousands, every minute of every day. The quality control in aviation is exceptional, and now I am speaking from personal experience. Even the smallest piece of hardware, such as a nut or a washer, has to be obtained from reliable sources which are approved by the FAA. Even a tiny O-ring is tracked, down to the source of the raw materials.

      There’s a standing joke that when the paperwork weighs as much as the plane, it’s ready to fly, but in the case of Apollo, it was probably true. The paperwork outweighed the hardware, when it came to the Lunar Module. I recall reading that several boxcars full of records existed for each item, by the time it was flight rated; innumerable non-routine job cards, signed off my the technical people that did the work, then stamped and signed off by an inspector.

      Apollo was a bold exercise. It involved the efforts of some very gifted people, building upon aerospace lessons learned over the years. Von Braun was somewhat conspicuous, because of being from a different country, being somewhat charismatic, and comporting himself well, on camera.

      But there were many truly fine people involved in the effort, such as John Houbolt, who promoted Lunar Orbit Rendezvous as the mode to achieve a successful mission, within the weight limitations, or Maxime Faget, who all but single-handedly came up with the concept for the Mercury capsule, which was the first manned spacecraft in the US space program.

      The space program, of that era, was an amazing achievement. It is criticized and ridiculed by some, but there is no way that such a project could be faked. I’ve visited the NASA Visitor’s Center in Houston, and seen firsthand the Saturn V. It’s beyond accurate description, and all but unimaginable that such a machine could fly. But then again, try walking up to a 747 from ground level, and you will be amazed that something so large can actually fly.

      I’ve been privileged to see some of the flight hardware in museums. The Visitor’s Center in Houston, and the Kansas Cosmosphere, in Hutchinson, KS. where the Apollo 13 Command Module is on display, along with many, many other items, which were designed by engineers with slide rules and a lot of imagination. I highly recommend the Kansas Cosmosphere.

  3. Indeed. You can’t keep a secret involving even a small handful of people for very long, without extraordinary measures, A conspiracy involving a half million people wouldn’t last a day.

    I’ve known people that worked on the space program. An uncle was involved in a small way on Project Gemini. A friend worked on the aluminum boxes used in tne collection of moon rocks.

    Indeed, tiny leaks could doom a mission, but the same can be said for the airline flights which happen in the thousands, every minute of every day. The quality control in aviation is exceptional, and now I am speaking from personal experience. Even the smallest piece of hardware, such as a nut or a washer, has to be obtained from reliable sources which are approved by the FAA. Even a tiny O-ring is tracked, down to the source of the raw materials.

    There’s a standing joke that when the paperwork weighs as much as the plane, it’s ready to fly, but in the case of Apollo, it was probably true. The paperwork outweighed the hardware, when it came to the Lunar Module. I recall reading that several boxcars full of records existed for each item, by the time it was flight rated; innumerable non-routine job cards, signed off my the technical people that did the work, then stamped and signed off by an inspector.

    Apollo was a bold exercise. It involved the efforts of some very gifted people, building upon aerospace lessons learned over the years. Von Braun was somewhat conspicuous, because of being from a different country, being somewhat charismatic, and comporting himself well, on camera.

    But there were many truly fine people involved in the effort, such as John Houbolt, who promoted Lunar Orbit Rendezvous as the mode to achieve a successful mission, within the weight limitations, or Maxime Faget, who all but single-handedly came up with the concept for the Mercury capsule, which was the first manned spacecraft in the US space program.

    The space program, of that era, was an amazing achievement. It is criticized and ridiculed by some, but there is no way that such a project could be faked. I’ve visited the NASA Visitor’s Center in Houston, and seen firsthand the Saturn V. It’s beyond accurate description, and all but unimaginable that such a machine could fly. But then again, try walking up to a 747 from ground level, and you will be amazed that something so large can actually fly.

    I’ve been privileged to see some of the flight hardware in museums. The Visitor’s Center in Houston, and the Kansas Cosmosphere, in Hutchinson, KS. where the Apollo 13 Command Module is on display, along with many, many other items, which were designed by engineers with slide rules and a lot of imagination. I highly recommend the Kansas Cosmosphere.

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