Category Archives: history

Was This Man King Arthur?

See the source image

In any lifelong search for the reality of King Arthur, one is bound to stumble over someone called “Riothamus,” or “Rigotamus.” In the ancient British language it means “great king,” so it might not have been his name. We might not know his name.

Riothamus is a historical figure, in the sense that historians are confident that he really existed, they know certain particulars of his career, he was mentioned by other historical figures, and he was most active around the year 470–which would put him in the generation preceding Arthur’s (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Riothamus).  We think, we are pretty sure, that he and his army invaded the European mainland to help the Romans against the Goths: and he then either settled in what is now Brittany, or returned to Britain and was killed by traitors there, or else was ambushed by overwhelming numbers of Goths and killed on that battlefield.

He might have been Aurelianus Ambrosius, who preceded Uther Pendragon, Arthur’s father, as the war-leader of the Britons. Ambrosius had much success against the invading Saxon tribes–until he was murdered.

This period of European history, when Rome was falling and tribes, not yet nations, were on the move, is a chaotic jumble and very hard to reconstruct. Arthur could have been Riothamus, if you adjust the dates accordingly. But then where do you put Uther, if you put him anywhere at all?

We live in hope that someday a few more ancient parchments will turn up in unlikely places, and provide some of the information that we lack.

All we can say for sure is that someone in Britain checked the invaders thoroughly enough so that a new nation, England, a Christian nation, could be born strong enough to survive in turbulent times. And that accomplishment has never been linked to any name but Arthur’s.

 

 


My Newswithviews Column, July 19 (‘What if the Past Judged Us?’)

See the source image

I wonder if he’d pray for us.

We’re always judging the people of the past, always finding them guilty–always virtue-signalling for 2019.

But what if the people of the past could judge our era, as we have judged theirs? Do you think we’d get off easy?

What if the Past Judged Us?

Meanwhile, I’m trying to understand why we ever let some communist paint a mural of George Washington’s life, and paid him out of the treasury. Why were we doing so much of that while FDR was president?

What goes around comes around.


Rushdoony: ‘The Dark Ages Defined’

See the source image

The “Dark Ages”? Really?

R.J. Rushdoony wrote this timeless piece in 2001.

https://chalcedon.edu/magazine/the-dark-ages-defined

And what is the answer to the question he posed: If Christ is not our King, then how can He be our Savior?

Something to think about, indeed.


Did Hillary and Obama Cover Up a State Dept. Pedophilia Sex Scandal?

See the source image

Never again!

I missed this story in 2013, as did a lot of people. But the nooze media did make mention of it, and here’s the video.

https://710wor.iheart.com/featured/mark-simone/content/2019-07-15-remember-when-hillary-clinton-covered-up-a-pedophilia-scandal/

NBC News reported that a U.S. ambassador “routinely ditched” his security personnel so he could pursue sexual liaisons with prostitutes and minor children–and that the investigation into this was “quashed” by orders from the highest levels of government.

And then the story went away.

What do you think would’ve happened to it if it had been about an ambassador appointed by Donald Trump and a cover-up ordered by someone in his administration? Do you think that story would’ve gone away?

The problem with Democrats is that they are altogether lawless, they never obey the law if they can break it, and the media always runs interference for them. True, NBC did report the story–but they didn’t exactly stick with it and dig up all the details, did they? And now that Obama has been canonized, the only “reporting” they’re going to do on his administration will be more in the nature of interior decorating.

Why wasn’t this ambassador removed from his office and charged with a crime? They could have at least sacked him, even if there was insufficient evidence to prove a criminal case.

Usually for leftids, the accusation is the evidence. Ask Brett Kavanagh: he knows all about that.


A Very Different World

I’ve been reading Herodotus again, who died in 425 B.C. after writing his comprehensive history of the wars between the Greeks and Persians–part history, part travelogue, all entertainment: that’s why it’s been in print for 2,400 years.

The thing that strikes me most powerfully is how unimaginably different his world was from ours. As widely traveled as he was, Herodotus had no idea of lots of things we take for granted. His world was bounded on the south by the Sahara Desert; on the east by the Indian desert; on the north by cold countries where feathers fell from the sky; and on the west by the Strait of Gibraltar. Beyond those boundaries, nothing was known for sure.

North of the Alps, north of the Danube River, Herodotus’ Europe might as well have been on Mars. Those unknown countries–Britain, Germany, Scandinavia, Eastern Europe, Russia–were said to be inhabited by giants, monsters, dog-headed people, and headless people with eyes in their chests. “I do not vouch for the truth of those accounts,” he admits.

I love reading about the giant ants the size of terriers, from which enterprising Indians stole gold dust, the squeaking “troglodytes” hunted by Libyan nomads, the fantastic treasures stored in assorted public places, and the know-it-all oracles whose advice is never understood but always turns out to be right; and colorful historical characters like Cyrus and the other Persian kings, rich Croesus, wise Solon, and all the rest.

Herodotus repeated so many tall tales that it harmed his reputation; Plutarch called him not “the father of history,” but the “father of lies.” But some of the tallest tales–which Herodotus said he didn’t believe, but were worth writing down as he heard them–have turned out to be shockingly true: like the Carthaginian mariners who circumnavigated Africa 2,000 years before Bartolomeo Dias did it, and the Sarmatians’ women warriors who weren’t allowed to marry until they’d killed an enemy in battle.

His was a colorful, crazy world. And you couldn’t find a MacDonald’s anywhere in Scythia.


Yankee Doodle

Hoping it will pump up my readers and bum out anyone who reads the New York Times, I offer this fife and drum rendition of Yankee Doodle.

The British made up this song to mock the upstart colonials who dared defy King George. They little dreamed the colonials would embrace the song on the way to kicking their butts back to England.

If you’ve got any liberals around, turn up the volume.


The Soviets’ ‘Land Battleship’

See the source image

For World War II tank buffs–the biggest tank ever, the Soviet Union’s T-35, the “land battleship.”

This monster, equipped with five (!) gun turrets, was just under 32 feet long and almost 11 feet wide, and weighed in at 54 tons. It was many times larger and heavier than anything the Germans had when they invaded Russia in 1940. But only 61 of them ever came off the assembly line, and most of them were lost in battle when they broke down due to mechanical failure and were abandoned by their crews.

It must’ve inspired more than a few anxious moments, to see one of these coming at you. But the problem was, the T-35 just didn’t work. It was very difficult to maintain, and who had the time or the equipment to maintain it? Sometimes bigger isn’t really better.

Well, it wasn’t the first super-weapon that didn’t live up to expectations; and it wasn’t the last. Something to keep in mind when designing–and paying for!–military technology.


‘The “Everybody Does It” Defense’ (2016)

Image result for images of bill clinton with monica lewinsky

POTUS with his favorite intern

Allowing the people to choose its leaders by voting for them was supposed to protect us from leaders who would corrupt us or prey on us. But all too often we choose a leader who’s only just come along, seems like a good idea at the time, and turns out to be as dirty as they come.

https://leeduigon.com/2016/02/25/the-everybody-does-it-defense/

The “Everybody Does It” defense is unworthy of adults–but boy, did we hear it a lot, during Bill Clinton’s presidency! And it wasn’t true! People insisted that it was, but they were wrong–and it was really quite easy to show them they were wrong.

Not that it changed anybody’s mind…


‘How to End Income Inequality’ (2014)

See the source image

When you see fabulously wealthy politicians and celebrities yapping their heads off about “Income Inequality,” you have to wonder if they’re quite all there. I mean, they could always give you half their money, to make you equal to them.

But they’d always rather give away someone else’s money.

https://leeduigon.com/2014/04/25/how-to-end-income-inequality/

Here is an example from history of a nation that actually achieved income equality, if only for a little while.

I think they hit upon the only way to do it.


‘A Grim Little Insight from History’ (2016)

See the source image

These observations by Gibbon on the fall of the Roman Empire were very much with me throughout the unhappy days of the Obama regime.

https://leeduigon.com/2016/07/02/a-grim-little-insight-from-history/

One thing I’ve learned from history: people never learn from it. We still offer “entertainment” as a substitute for life. We can’t seem to get rid of government officials who are so bad, so incompetent, so determined to amass power as an end in itself, that you’d swear they were doing it on purpose.


%d bloggers like this: