‘Just In: Is This Shark 500 Years Old?’ (2017)

Greenland shark is world's oldest

The Greenland shark, up to 20 feet long, lives in really cold Arctic water, sometimes under the ice, occasionally venturing up the St. Lawrence River. Not much point being afraid of them! You’d die of exposure before the sharks could get you.

Anyhow, certain scientists now believe these Greenland sharks can live preposterously long lives–up to 500 years.

Just In: Is This Shark 500 Years Old?

I have written thousands of posts for this blog. Would you believe that this thing about the shark is my all-time best-liked post? Well, OK, it only had to get 18 likes to do that.

But the important thing is, How old is this shark, really? And if there’s a trick to it, Heaven forbid anyone in Congress ever finds out what it is.

Just In: Is This Shark 500 Years Old?

Greenland shark is world's oldest

Danish scientists say this 18-foot-long Greenland shark is probably over 500 years old. Absent a birth certificate, that figure is an estimate. But it’s cool to think this fish was swimming around some years before Shakespeare was in knee pants. When it was born, they say, Henry VIII was only 14 years old. (https://www.dailystar.co.uk/news/weird-news/666587/shark-oldest-living-vertebrate-greenland)

Greenland sharks are known to get very large, up to 20 feet. They’re in the dogfish family–those little sharks you always catch when you’re trying to catch something else. They can live under the Arctic ice pack. Why they should choose to is another story.

How seriously do we take this claim that this particular shark is 512 years old?

Search me. This is Mr. Nature, reporting on God’s stuff.