Tag Archives: mr. nature

Mr. Nature: A Lobster’s Teeth

See the source image

Jambo! Mr. Nature here. And if you want to see a lobster’s teeth, don’t bother looking in its mouth. No, the lobster’s teeth are in its hands. See the picture.

The left claw contains the molars. Take a closer look: they’re not so different from our molars. They are instantly recognizable–but for their weird location–as molars.

The cutting teeth are in the right-hand claw.

God’s stuff can leave us shaking our heads. Try to imagine having your teeth in the palms of your hands. I’ll understand if you cringe.

The lobster has the kind of teeth it needs to process its food. Its teeth are similar to mammals’ teeth. I can easily see God designing them like that on purpose. I can’t see mammals’ teeth “evolving” from lobsters’, or mammals and lobsters inheriting their teeth from some imaginary common ancestor. (But you can’t allow free speech because then some people might say they don’t believe in Evolution and next thing you know we’ll have a theocracy blah-blah-blah…)

God’s stuff is just so cool.


Mr. Nature: Hatching Praying Mantises

Jambo! Mr. Nature here, with more of God’s stuff–and a safari that you can stage at home, indoors.

When I was a little boy, I found what I thought was a butterfly cocoon. I brought it indoors and put it in my lizards’ aquarium, to keep it warm and so I could see the butterfly hatch out. Imagine my surprise when, instead of a nice big butterfly, a million of these little critters came marching out of the egg case–baby praying mantises. The lizards didn’t eat them; they seemed alarmed. I had to move them to another tank. The next day I took the tankful of mantises to school for show-and-tell, and then let them go in my mother’s garden.

You wouldn’t believe how many tiny mantises come out of just one egg case! My wife had this same experience when she was a little girl, and it freaked her out–her mother, too.

But don’t be scared. Each and every one of those little bugs is a potential warrior for your garden, and will grow up to be an insatiable predator of harmful insects that want to eat your plants.

On its own small scale, a praying mantis hatch is awesome to behold. But don’t keep them so warm that they hatch out while it’s still winter. And have a care for your lizards’ peace of mind.

 


Mr. Nature: Wolf Pup’s First Howl

Somebody just told me “Nature” is “Erutan” spelled backwards. Get a life.

It’s hard to believe this little fella will grow up to be a top predator–scourge of the caribou, bane of the bison. Wolves will even eat people, if there’s nothing better going.

But all God’s stuff is created for a reason: and we just can’t help loving baby animals. He did that for a reason, too.


Don’t Try This at Home!

Jambo, everybody, Mr. Nature here–with something that you should absolutely positively never try to do.

The guy in this video got away with it. But if his feet had slipped on the wet grass…

Mother alligators and crocodiles guard their nests, and some continue to guard the babies after they’ve hatched, going so far as to transfer them to a nursery pond where it’s easier to keep an eye on them. Gators do not take kindly to anyone messing with their babies.

Most reptiles don’t bother, but alligators do. It’s such a departure from standard reptilian behavior, one is tempted to conclude that gators and crocs aren’t really reptiles at all, but rather are in a class by themselves.

Anyway, gator nests and nursery ponds are good places to avoid–at all times.


Mr. Nature: The Walking Worm

It’s not a worm, it’s not an insect–in fact, scientists still don’t know what it is for sure.

Presenting the Peripatus, aka the Velvet Worm, aka the Walking Worm. There are many species living throughout the Southern Hemisphere and around the Equator. They’re small, they come out mostly at night, and they creep around the leaf litter–so they aren’t often seen.

Jambo! This is Mr. Nature, with more of God’s stuff. We have plenty of fossils of various walking worms, and those look just like the worms we have today. They’ve had all that time–half a billion years! say the Darwinists–to evolve into Gender Studies professors, and look at ’em: they’re still walking worms.

Well, heck–they’re good at being walking worms, they’ve got it down to a science. Some species lay eggs, some bear live young. They all eat small insects, spraying a sticky good onto their prey to immobilize it. They are as God created them. They have no power to harm us in any way, and they look cool. Fascinating little creatures.


Not Really So Slow, Is He?

Jambo, everybody! Mr. Nature here.

The Komodo dragon, the world’s largest living lizard, often looks to us like he’d be slow and clumsy. That’s because they’re often filmed right after they eat; and when they eat, they gorge themselves and waddle around all bloated.

But here in a park–yes, it’s a park, not a wilderness: you can see the nice bike lanes–a Komodo dragon decides he’d like a haunch of venison. As he approaches, in plain sight, the deer decide it’s time to move out. And they decide just in time–he almost catches one! And then gives chase.

He can’t catch up to a deer running flat-out, but he’s still going pretty fast.

If you’re thinking of visiting Komodo Island, where these lizards are the apex predators, be very, very sure that you can outrun this critter. Each year they do manage to catch and eat a tourist or two.

(Sheesh, it’s a freakin’ park! Imagine that coming at you in Roosevelt Park. I’m gonna have nightmares…)


Mr. Nature: The Last Cricket

It’s almost Thanksgiving, we’ve already had some bitter cold weather, with a few snow flurries–and the other night, outside, Patty heard the last cricket of the summer chirping away. Calling to whom, we can’t imagine.

Jambo, Mr. Nature here–and the first time I tried to get this video on youtube, I just got all this Indian and Pakistani cricket news. No, no–not that cricket!

I love to listen to the crickets. I used to buy them as food for my turtle, but had to give that up real fast because I got kind of attached to the crickets. What did they ask of me? Water, wheat germ, a little place to hide. It was something to come downstairs on New Years morning to the sound of crickets merrily chirping away, and all that snow and ice outside.

A healthy cricket can live for a year or so, but not outdoors. Unless they can get inside a house, they won’t make it through the winter.

And I’m here to tell you they’ll go right on laying eggs until the end. No fear of running out of crickets!


Mr. Nature: Mosasaurus

The Komodo dragon of Indonesia is, as Bob and Ray observed, the world’s largest living lizard. Full-grown at ten feet long and 300 pounds, occasionally it eats… people.

Some thousands of years ago, certain monitor lizards in Australia grew to be twice the size of a Komodo dragon. But they were pipsqueaks compared to the Mosasaurus of the Cretaceous Period (or whenever–we don’t want to take such things too seriously).

As you can see in this clip from Jurassic World, the Mosasaur was very, very big–up to thirty or even forty feet long, depending on the species. Mosasaurs are all the rage in dinosaur movies today, and of course their size is exaggerated therein. Closely related to today’s monitor lizards, the Mosasaur was likely the supreme predator of its time. Instead of legs it had flippers, so it had to stay in the water. And no, it was not as big as a New Jersey township.

What hath God wrought? We can only marvel at the scanty remains of these gigantic creatures that are no longer with us. Where they are now, only the God who made them knows. But maybe someday He will tell us.


Mr. Nature: The Hummingbird Moth

Jambo, Mr. Nature here–and would you believe it? I have never seen a hummingbird. I’ve never seen a hummingbird moth, either, so I can’t say how much they resemble one another.

But watch this moth. Like  hummingbird, it can fly backwards. I’ve never seen a moth or butterfly do that. It can also hover as it sucks nectar from a flower.

How can two creatures so widely unrelated be so similar to one another? Attributing this to evolution based on blind chance and environmental opportunities seems like a real stretcher to me.

God’s stuff–it does give us a lot to think about.


We’ve Got Honeybees

See the source image

Enough of nooze, enough of politics: let’s look at some of God’s stuff instead. In this case, I only have to look out my living room window.

Because my wife has been so sick–she’s getting better now, praise God: and thank you all for your prayers, the Lord has heard them–we didn’t have a garden this year. We let our little garden plot grow wild, and by the end of the summer, had a lush growth of wonderful little white flowers. Queen Anne’s lace, they’re called.

And the bees just love ’em! Early in the morning, the bumblebees are already at work. Then come the little native bees. And a little later, hallelujah–honeybees!

We hear that honeybees are in trouble everywhere–disease and habitat destruction being the chief culprits. For a while there we weren’t seeing any honeybees at all. But wherever their hive is (we don’t know), the tiny white flowers of the Queen Anne’s Lace are bringing them here. Once the day warms up a little, we’ve always got honeybees. And it pleases us to think we’ve got something that they like–flowers that we never planted, but that God has provided.

Thank you for that, O Father!


%d bloggers like this: