Tag Archives: s.d. smith

‘The Green Ember’: A Fantasy Fit for Kids to Read

Image result for images of the green ember

Every now and then, in my search for suitable reading matter for children, I turn up gold–like, for instance, The Green Ember, by S.D. Smith.

https://chalcedon.edu/magazine/review-of-the-green-ember-novel

It’s a heroic fantasy featuring rabbits with swords, instead of people. And it’s about faith, hope, family, and self-sacrifice. This puts it miles apart from most of the Young Adult fiction that’s out there; and it’s written well enough for adults to enjoy it, too.

We do need more of this, much more. People of all ages consume huge amounts of “entertainment,” mostly without realizing that this is a passive but very effective form of self-education. We need to consume and digest more faith, more hope, more charity.

More Green Ember, less Spirit Animals.


A Five-Star Fantasy

Every now and then I get to read and review a book that makes my work a pleasure. S.D. Smith’s The Black Star of Kingston is such a book. It’s been a long time since I read a book that so deeply moved me.

Smith’s first book in what I hope will be a long series, The Green Ember, was very good–but this, a prequel, is even better. It’s a little book. You could read it in a sitting, but I stretched it out to two sittings because I didn’t want it to end.

It’s a simple story of rabbits–very human rabbits, with a government, industries, arts and crafts, etc.–trying to establish themselves in a new home, after being driven out of their old home by merciless enemies. Why rabbits instead of people? Well, why not? It’s a fantasy for children, and children like animal characters.

Smith is a good enough writer to make it look easy, a very good writer indeed. His suspense is masterful, and the action of the climax is intense. Maybe a little too intense for some young readers–but to write it off as a children’s book is to rob adult readers. This is, quite simply, the best book I’ve read in quite a while.

What’s it about? It’s about love, courage, and loyalty. Friendship and self-sacrifice. Hope and faith. Although it’s not overtly “Christian,” it certainly conforms to Christian values. Not that we have a monopoly on these: we don’t. But taken as a whole, I call it a thoroughly Christian book. And a visit to Mr. Smith’s website, http://www.sdsmith.net , will leave you in no doubt as to his religious sensibilities.

Don’t let this one slip past you. Read it!


Rabbits With Swords–a Fantasy You Can Believe In

After all the awful fantasies I’ve read, I’ve finally found a good one: The Green Ember by S.D. Smith, a tale of rabbits with swords. It’s available on amazon.com.

OK, it’s a fairy tale. All the characters are talking animals. The rabbits have been crushed by their enemies and are trying to rebuild their world. They are kept alive by hope and faith. Their society is built around strong and loving families. For love and loyalty, they will make sacrifices.

I recommend this book without reservation. I’ll be writing a full-length review of it for The Chalcedon Foundation; and of course you can go to amazon and read the large number of five-star Customer Reviews. Meanwhile, though, I have heard from some who most emphatically do not like The Green Ember.

“Not a single f-bomb in the whole [bleep] thing!” complains the Citizen of the World Library Assn. “How are kids supposed to learn how to talk, reading [bleep] [bleep] like this?”

“Would you believe it,” cries the reviewer for Musical Feminists Inc., “one of the characters in this far-Right propaganda hate-piece actually refers to ‘having babies’! I thought I was going to be sick!”

Grumbles Fred Vermin of The Science Is Settled, So All of You Shut Up, “Not one word in it about man-made Global Warming, I mean Climate Change! I suspect this Smith guy of being a secret Climate Change Denier. He should be jailed and tortured, just in case.”

Wanda Byaduck of The Whoopee Crowd beefed, “I don’t know how you write a book for children without detailed sex scenes. I think this author is a homophobe! And probably a transphobe, too, and any other kind of phobe we can dream up between now and suppertime.”

Added Dotti Frump of the Hillary Clinton for President Campaign, “The whole thing is coded language expressing hatred for women and a pathological fear of Mrs. Clinton. It should be taken off the market!”

So, folks, enjoy this book while you can. It’s written for kids, but adults can enjoy a noble tale like this, as soon as they’ve outgrown their education.


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