Tag Archives: pontius pilate

‘Post-Truth Politics’–Oh, Boy!

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A pioneer of post-truth: Pontius Pilate

Say hey (quoting my boyhood hero, Willie Mays)! Did you know we’re in the era of “post-truth politics”? In fact, we’re so in the era of post-truth, the Oxford English Dictionary chose “post-truth” as its 2016 Word of the Year.

Democrats (it’s pointless to say leftids; all Democrats are leftids anymore) and academics are rather proud of this achievement, even though the American Psychiatric Ass. says trying to achieve things is a sign of toxic masculinity, and ought to be stopped. Pontius Pilate once asked, cynically, “What is truth?” If he were here today, he’d be chairman of the Democrat National Committee.

Wikipedia lists the chief characteristics of post-truth politics: appeals to emotion; constant repetition of talking points; and ignore factual rebuttals (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Post-truth_politics). They left out the other chief characteristics which are so easily observable: violence and the threat of violence; shout down dissenters; calling everyone who dissents from their position “white supremacists” or some other term of abuse; and using the social media to censor any departure from the Far Left Crazy manifesto. I put that in because every gang of nincompoops has a manifesto.

Our sages at the looniversities teach that there’s no such thing as truth, there are only “constructs,” and you’d better kow-tow to their constructs if you know what’s good for you.

Our Lord Jesus Christ said, “To this end was I born, and for this cause came I into the world, that I should bear witness unto the truth. Every one that is of the truth heareth my voice.” (John 18:37)

We’ll take that over “post-truth” every time, thank you.


Movie Review: ‘Risen’

If you like “Bible movies,” Risen is a good one. And let me tell you the best thing about it.

It’s a single scene, starring an actor in a small part. Richard Atwill plays one of the Roman guards who was on duty at Jesus’ tomb when He rose from the dead, and he tries to tell you what is was like. It would be wrong of me to reveal any of the details. I highly recommend seeing it for yourself.

Risen is the story of a Roman army officer, Clavius–played with stern conviction by Joseph Fiennes–who is ordered by Pilate (Peter Firth) to track down Jesus’ body, arrest the disciples, and prove that the Resurrection was a hoax. And this without drawing a single paycheck from a modern teachers’ union.

There’s a lot of grim and even gruesome detail in this movie; but on the plus side, it’s a loving and realistic rendering of Jesus and His disciples. I would have liked to see more of Pilate’s inner conflict that the Scripture suggests, but you can’t have everything. Fiennes is really good, and so are all the actors playing the apostles. There’s a trace of Catholic bias in it, but that really shouldn’t be a major problem for the viewer.

On the whole, though, the screenplay sticks fairly close to Scripture. No movie can be a substitute for the Bible. But a good one might draw a viewer nearer to it.


Common Core Teaches Only “Science” is True

If you read nothing else today, read the New York Times article by philosophy professor Justin McBrayer, “Why Our Children Don’t Think There Are Moral Facts” ( http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/03/02/why-our-children-dont-think-there-are-moral-facts/ ).

Professor McBrayer discovered that, as part of Common Core–control of public education curriculum, nationwide, by the federal government–children are being taught that something is either a Fact or an Opinion. A fact, said a poster in his son’s second-grade classroom is something that is true about a subject and can be proven. An opinion is what someone thinks, feels, or believes.

So what’s wrong with that?

First, says the professor, the teaching is that “truth” and “proof” are the same thing–when, of course, they aren’t. “It’s a mistake to confuse truth (a feature of the world) with proof (a feature of our mental lives).”

Second, he explains, the teaching is that any claim is either a fact or an opinion–never both. “Value claims,” therefore–claims that an act is right or wrong, good or evil, “are not facts.”

Yup, everything but mainline “science” is just a fantasy in someone’s individual mind, and can only be ignored.  So there’s no such thing as “truth”: it’s either “your truth” or “my truth.” Thank you, Pontius Pilate.

The professor is right on target, as far as he goes. But his article does not explain why the same moral illiterates who teach children that the only claims that are “true” are those “facts” established by Science, fly into a frenzy at the slightest suggestion that, for instance, marriage consists of a man and a woman. There is no “scientific proof” that it does. There is no “scientific proof” that it doesn’t. But just say the magic words, and that whole “your truth, my truth” thing goes out the window and the Diversity crowd wants to destroy you.

Prof. McBrayer does suggest that there is a certain element of Doublethink involved in this whole enterprise. That’s putting it mildly.

So what do you get when you have “scientific truth” without any concept of moral truth?

You get Frankenstein. Every single time.


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