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Movie Review, ‘Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom’

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We rented Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom this weekend, and it was everything we wanted from it. We weren’t looking for Shakespearean soliloquies.

So what we got were dinosaurs, and plenty of ’em, including some nice ones that haven’t been seen in the earlier Jurassic Park movies: a very nice Carnotaurus, and of course a new genetically-engineered man-made not-natural dinosaur that looks like New Jersey’s own Dryptosaurus. Three cheers! Plus the Mosasaur as big as your average township: surfers beware.

As usual, there are bad guys trying to exploit the dinosaurs, good guys trying to stop them, and the dinosaurs get loose and everything goes all pear-shaped, fanabla… I really don’t want to hit you with any spoilers, so suffice it to say that Fallen Kingdom offers a lot of the original Jurassic Park motifs, plus a couple of brand-new ones, at least one of which is just spectacular and you wonder why no one ever did it before. This is a dinosaur chase scene like none you’ve ever seen. Patty wound up dreaming she was being chased by an alligator, and I got kicked a dozen times before I could wake her up.

There are critics who want to put the whole Jurassic Park franchise out to pasture, they’re tired of these dinosaurs, the story line’s always the same, blah-blah. Bunch of spoil-sports. Sure, there are downright silly moments in any Jurassic Park movie–especially JP No. 2, The Lost World, which boasts a virtual dictionary of silly moments–but we don’t watch these movies in search of whatever it is that some of these critics are searching for. We watch ’em for dinosaurs, we get dinosaurs, the bad guys get what’s coming to them, the story line suggests yet another sequel, and we come away satisfied. What’s not to like?


Mr. Nature on the Giant Monster

Hi, Mr. Nature here. I’ve just been watching that Mosasaurus scene from Jurassic World, and it has me in stitches.

Mosasaurs were lizards, related to monitor lizards, that lived in the sea long ago.  There were many species of them, found here and there and everywhere. I once dug up a nice Mosasaur tooth right here in New Jersey.

The premise of this movie is that people even get bored with live dinosaurs, after a while, so Science has to somehow give them bigger and better dinosaurs. By “better” they mean scarier and more dangerous. So they use cloning and genetic engineering to create this terrible monster…

Well, fry my hide, they’ve already got this Mosasaurus! Here they are, feeding it a great white shark. Might as well give it something that’s not at all easy to come by. An adult great white shark is anywhere from 12 to 20 feet long, but it looks like a sardine compared to the Mosasaur. That would make the Mosasaur… oh, better than 100 feet long. Bigger than a blue whale. And they’ve got it in an aquarium.

I’m sorry, but that’s funny! I mean, it’s a fun movie, I enjoyed it no end–but reality it’s not.

Christians, never forget, never forget, that in our popular culture, that we live in, science and fantasy and pure humbug are tangled together worse than the hideous snarl of wires behind my computer. Feel free to enjoy the entertainment value–but make very sure you’re never taken in by it. If you want absolute truth, you have to go to God’s word for that.

Don’t let your fun be the enemy of your integrity.


Movie Review, ‘Jurassic World’

It’s Patty’s birthday this weekend, so we watched Jurassic World, aka Jurassic Park IV.

Okay, all the disastrous mistakes that plagued the original Jurassic Park have been rectified, and the new park is wide-open for business. But a whole new set of disastrous cock-ups is just waiting to erupt.

This is one of those movies that delivers exactly what you want–well, what we wanted, at least. We wanted dinosaurs, and dinosaurs we got: even a giant Mosasaurus which is not, strictly speaking, a dinosaurs, but it’s prehistoric and it eats living things.

We wanted thrills, and we got them. We wanted eye-popping special effects, and we got those. And as an added treat, there were several brief salutes to the original Jurassic Park, including a cameo appearance by Mr. DNA.

Occasionally it seemed the screenwriters were tempted to get sidetracked by penetrating insights into the characters’ personal lives, but drew back from this before any serious harm was done to the movie. I mean, you’re getting chased around by dinosaurs who are trying to eat you alive–who’s got time to worry about relationships?

This film gives us new dinosaurs–the Mosasaur, a really ugly pterodactyl (Dimorphodon), and, to top it all, a “not real” dinosaur that never existed in nature but was cooked up by the lab boys because the park’s investors demanded something bigger, meaner, and scarier than the real dinos. B.D. Wong is back as Henry Wu, the genius who ran John Hammond’s dino factory in Jurassic Park I.  He’s back and he hasn’t learned a thing.

So they come up with this artificial critter they name Indominius–nasty, nasty, nasty! It’s full of genes from all sorts of animals, and on top of that, it’s been raised in isolation which has made it crazy. The thing I loved about Indominius is, it’s basically a giant Dryptosaurus–which was a distant relative of T. rex, about half the size, with long, powerful arms and long, sharp, eagle-like claws: New Jersey’s pride and joy.

Here is the heart of the movie. Here is Unintelligent Design at work. Borrowing from the genuine creation of the sovereign God, blockheads cobble together a new kind of animal. They do this to make money and earn science kudos. They have very little understanding of animals in general and no understanding whatsoever of this particular animal. Their hubris, their ignorance, and their greed all turn around and bite them in the ass.

Just like in the first Jurassic Park.

“Ye shall be as gods” was a snare and a delusion when the Serpent first whispered it to Eve in Eden, and is to this day the Devil’s most irresistible bait.

Aside from my inborn yearning for dinosaurs and other prehistoric animals, I love these movies as parables. It’s amazing how little the human race learns from its mistakes.

Therefore speak I to them in parables: because they seeing see not; and hearing they hear not, neither to they understand… For this people’s heart is waxed  gross, and their ears are dull of hearing, and their eyes they have closed; lest at any time they should see with their eyes, and hear with their ears, and should understand with their heart, and should be converted, and I should heal them. (Matthew 13:13, 15)


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