Comment Contest: A Winner Today?

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Even the newly-hatched day geckos are excited by the prospect of someone winning our comment contest today! You should hear ’em.

Anyway, we’re shooting for 33,000 comments and we’ve got, at the moment, 32,931–which leaves only 69 comments to go. Whoever posts Comment No. 33,000 will win an autographed copy of one of my books. (Sorry, the treasure deal fell through. Beowulf chickened out of taking on the dragon. “Not as young as I used to be!” was his excuse.)

Now, I can’t help noticing that a few of you are trying very hard to win the contest. It’s always a sad thing to watch the comment stream slow down to a mere trickle, once the contest is over. I wish you could all win, but my postal budget won’t stand it.

But what I can do is start another contest right away, setting the goal at 35,000. The folks at Chalcedon are working very hard to get The Temptation published, and once we get the cover art from Kirk DouPonce, it shouldn’t be long before the book is released–maybe in time to be the prize in the next contest.

Comment Contest Down to the Wire

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Who will win the comment contest? As of this moment, we have 32,890 comments in the pot–only 110 to go, to reach the goal of 33,000.

What’s the prize? Well, nobody wanted to go back to 1951 and hit Bobby Thomson’s home run, so now I’m thinking, “Treasure!” There’s this guy named Beowulf who says he knows the location of a fabulously wealthy hoard of gold and jewels. So we’ll try to make that the prize–if we can figure out what to do about the dragon who is guarding it.

If this treasure deal falls through, the prize will be an autographed copy of one of my books.

‘Another Fantasy Flop’ (2012)

Don’t you get tired of this age? I sure do. Don’t you get tired of movies and books in which everybody stinks and nobody’s a hero?

We really do have to get out from under the spiritual yoke that self-proclaimed intellectuals have laid across our necks.

https://leeduigon.com/2012/09/09/another-fantasy-flop/

‘Smearing a Hero’ (2012)

Reely Smart People don’t believe anyone can be good, so they make and patronize movies in which all the characters are rotten. That makes them even Smarter.

https://leeduigon.com/2012/06/27/smearing-a-hero/

Scholar (LOL) Thinks Vikings May Have Been Muslims

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So they found some silken goods in Viking Age burials (9th-10th centuries) in Sweden, and some of these pieces had the name “Allah” woven into them in Arabic writing–so that must mean the Vikings were, well… Muslims (http://metro.co.uk/2017/10/12/were-vikings-muslim-new-research-finds-allah-woven-into-burial-clothes-6995713/). At least, so says a scholar who may have watched The Thirteenth Warrior a few more times than is good for her.

And just to state my bona fides, my specialty in college was the history of the Viking Age. So I know hooey when I see it, and this is hooey. It’s just part of academic leftids’ infatuation with Islam. I knew my education would come in handy someday, if I only waited long enough.

Some of the clothes also have little swastikas woven into them. If we keep looking into ancient Swedish graves, will we find Martin Bormann?

If ever any people left behind an abundant and reliable written record, it was the Scandinavians of the Viking Age. I mean, they wrote down everything! And somehow not a single mention of any “Muslim vikings” appears in any of the sagas, poems, histories, Eddas, or in the copious writings of the great 13th-century Icelandic historian, Snorri Sturlusson. That this curious cultural phenomenon should have eluded Snorri is a preposterous idea.

But when it comes to academics swooning over Islam, it’s “Preposterous ‘R’ Us.” This scholar, for example, speculates on the Scandinavian peoples of the Viking Age picking up “Islamic ideas such as eternal life in paradise after death.” Apparently this ignoramus never heard of Valhalla, never read Beowulf, and has picked up a very bad habit, so prevalent among self-anointed scholars nowadays, of talking through her hat.

The fact is, because the Vikings themselves sailed over as much of the world as they could, stuff from every place you could think of wound up in their possession–by looting, trading, or buying. Silk from the East was a luxury item that always sold well in the West. A silken blouse woven in Persia would have made a nice anniversary present for Helga in Uppsala.

But by now I have probably told you more than you wanted to know.