Tag Archives: Mark Rushdoony

‘The Certainty of God’s Will’

See the source image

There’s a lot of good stuff on the Chalcedon website today, and I hope some of you will visit it. But I’d like to highlight this message Mark Rushdoony wrote, the day after Thanksgiving.

https://chalcedon.edu/blog/the-certainty-of-gods-will

“Without a belief in the certainty of God’s will being done on earth as it is in heaven, we could become very discouraged,” Mark writes. That’s putting it mildly. Even the martyred saints in paradise find it hard to wait for that. If you don’t have a Bible handy, here’s the verses:

…I saw under the altar the souls of them that were slain for the word of God, and for the testimony which they held: And they cried with a loud voice, saying, How long, O Lord, holy and true, dost thou not judge and avenge our blood on them that dwell on the earth? (Revelation 6:9-10)

We have to be faithful, we have to be patient.

God will do everything that He has said He will do, in His own time.

We have His promise. And we have His Son.

 


‘Thanks Be to God’ (2001)

As you read this, Patty and I are on our way to Thanksgiving dinner with my brother and sister, and trying to stay alive on the Parkway. I appreciate your prayers to help us get there and back without any distressing incidents.

Mark Rushdoony wrote and published this piece in 2001, Thanks Be to God.

https://chalcedon.edu/magazine/thanks-be-to-god

“The more we recognize what God does for us,” he said, “the more we see who God is.”

The Bible tells us of many ways and occasions of giving thanks to God. Importantly, thanksgiving to God ought to be a matter of personal gratitude. Personal. We are persons because God is a person, and He made us in His image.

We can start with thanking Him for that!


God’s People and ‘Nature’

See the source image

Mark Rushdoony wrote “Man and the Earth: Environmentalism vs. Kingdom Responsibility,” as a Chalcedon editorial in 2009. It seems to be more on target today than it was ten years ago.

https://chalcedon.edu/magazine/man-and-the-earth-environmentalism-versus-kingdom-responsibility

Environmentalism “is based on evolutionary assumptions about the most fundamental aspects of man’s being,” Mark wrote. As a result, “nature” gradually replaces God in the minds and hearts of the worldly.

Is it necessary to observe that the very same people who are always yammering about “green this” and “green that” are also the very first to pave the green over, if they think it’ll net them another 25 cents or another vote? Anyone who thinks Democrats “protect the environment” needs to tour New Jersey.

In the long run, Mark writes, “the sin is not against the earth, but God.” And God will use the earth to punish the sinners.


‘The Christian and the Cultural Wars’

See the source image

I have to go vegetate in the veterinarian’s waiting room, but first let me post this Chalcedon editorial by Mark Rushdoony, from 2004:

https://chalcedon.edu/magazine/the-christian-and-the-cultural-wars

Christ’s command to “Occupy until I come” (Luke 19:13) should have been the church’s watchword–and ours, too, individually.

Because we didn’t occupy, the ungodly came out of the woodwork and occupied our culture; and we’re having a very hard time holding on to the little bit they’ve left us.

Work harder. Pray harder. Sing louder. And proclaim the truth.


‘The Battlefield Ahead’

See the source image

Christian school–way more dangerous to the bad guys than it looks

In this Chalcedon editorial, Mark Rushdoony reminds us to keep our eye on the ball, as it were–the ball being the need to re-Christianize our society from the ground up, starting with ourselves and our families.

https://chalcedon.edu/blog/the-battlefield-ahead

We need to win battles in the culture war, but we have to get out of having to fight all the battles on ground chosen by the enemy. Christian families, Christian schools, Christian neighborhoods and fellowships, and even Christianized workplaces–these are the kind of developments that are well within our scope to create.

And their creation will give the bad guys fits.


‘The Next Phase of History’

Image result for images of titanic sinking

In light of some of the totally daft public policies and cultural spasms we’ve been reading about this week, we might well ask, “What is the next phase of history?”

https://chalcedon.edu/blog/the-next-phase-of-history

Mark Rushdoony has a thoughtful essay–and in it, I think, he’s dug his way down to the heart of the matter.

Humanism, now embracing and promoting such total irrationalities as “transgender” and “open borders,” while at the same time proclaiming the imminent end of the world unless we all do exactly as they tell us–humanism has embraced its own destruction.

Because, as Mark says, reality is real and cannot be pushed aside by any amount of wishful thinking.

And it will devour those irrationalities.

What will replace humanism? We pray it will be a new growth in God’s Kingdom on the earth–which we can already see happening in such unlikely places as China and Iran.

I look forward to the day when “gender fluid” will be of interest only to cryptozoologists.


‘No Heroes in the Kingdom of God’

See the source image

Do you ever get the feeling that nothing you do, personally, serves God and His Kingdom in any meaningful way?

You can stop fretting. It’s God who advances the Kingdom; we are only honored to be His servants.

Mark Rushdoony addresses that issue in a recent essay for Chalcedon.

https://chalcedon.edu/blog/no-heroes-in-the-kingdom-of-god

We can’t all be Martin Luther or Mother Theresa. But we can all be faithful.


‘As Bright as the Promises of God’

See the source image

I seem to be doing an awful lot of Bible stuff today. Well, when’s a bad time for that?

This heartening essay is by Mark Rushdoony for today’s Chalcedon Blog:

https://chalcedon.edu/blog/as-bright-as-the-promises-of-god

We are not just to believe God’s promises, Mark writes, not just to refrain from doubting them, but “to live in terms of their certainty” and “to live and act in faithfulness to the certainty that He will accomplish it.”

That’s what makes them certainty: He, not we, will accomplish it.

But He does like it when we work with Him.


Where We’re Headed (Praise God!)

See the source image

Mark Rushdoony wrote this timely reminded of where we and our world are going. It’s a Chalcedon blog piece: “The Operation of God’s Perpetual Providence.”

https://chalcedon.edu/blog/the-operation-of-gods-perpetual-providence

Eschatology, he says, has got to be “our ‘big picture’ of where history is going.” And we find that information in God’s word.

For God’s providence is never turned off, He is never not on duty. He will do all the things He has said He will do, and we who are His people are, by His loving grace, a part of that. We are not orphans: we have a Father. And a place in Christ’s Kingdom.

Something to remember, in this evil age.


‘Cherry-Picking at Our Peril’

See the source image

In the Ancient Near East, there was no universally-accepted calendar. The same kinds of “discrepancies” are found in every kingdom’s annals.

In this April 30 Chalcedon blog post, Mark Rushdoony tackles the question of whether the Bible is accurate as to matters of historical fact.

https://chalcedon.edu/blog/cherry-picking-at-our-peril

Critics like to point to supposed “discrepancies” within the Bible: for example, when it comes to stating how many years were in the reign of a king of Israel or Judah. At that point in world history, there was no widely-accepted standard of timekeeping, no universal calendar. Nor, within the same kingdom, was there any agreement as to when a king’s reign actually began or ended. So naturally the numbers will differ, here and there.

The point is, the Bible is 100% reliable and, as the Word of God, 100% authoritative–even when we can’t understand some of the historical details.

If your faith stands or falls by how well the numbers tally in Kings and Chronicles, there’s not much to it.


%d bloggers like this: