My Old Horror Novels

Schoolhouse by Lee Duigon

Pretty hokey cover, isn’t it? But that was Schoolhouse, my second published novel, from 1988.

My wife has been re-reading my old horror novels. I sold the first one, Lifeblood, in 1986 and the last one, Mind Stealer, came out in 1990. Not a very long career.

Anyway, she thinks these are terrific horror novels. It makes me wonder if anyone else out there has read them. Brief descriptions follow:

Lifeblood: A vampire preys on the people of an affluent suburban township.

Schoolhouse: This school is haunted by a lot more than just ghosts.

Precog: Can psychic powers be created by science? Rather harrowing, finding out.

Mind Stealer: What happens when you mix business theory with devilish occult practices?

Look, it was a long time ago, I was writing because it seemed my only chance to achieve something, anything, in life–and then the horror market imploded in 1990 and a lot of us horror writers got cast aside. Adios, muchachos.

I don’t write books like this anymore. I don’t write solely for my own aggrandizement anymore: if my books don’t serve Christ’s Kingdom, they might as well not be written. The horror novels are full of all those dirty words and morally dubious behaviors that seemed so up-to-date and with-it back then. But they also contain some memorable scenes and characters and I would rate them as very good examples of that kind of literature.

Some of you will disagree with me, but I don’t think that horror novels or horror movies are entirely without merit. If nothing else, a good one can blow out the cobwebs. It can, for a little time, allow you to forget the real horror of a nation menaced by Democrats. A good scare, administered by a haint or a monster that doesn’t really exist and will soon go away, has a therapeutic value.

The worldly monsters that we have to deal with, they never go away.

Win a Vintage Horror Novel Cover

I just found a stack of these covers from my antique horror novel, Mind Stealer, published by Pinnacle Books in 1990. These covers include the back cover, too, so you can read the blurb written by some monkey who never read the blinkin’ thing.

Anyway, these are in mint condition and I don’t write stuff like this anymore, so you might say they were a collector’s item. And you can win one! Just send in Comment No. 64,000…

Or else write a convincing reason, in 25 words or less, why you want this item. Best reason wins!

Writing the Cover Blurb

Now that I’ve got a cover for The Silver Trumpet, I have to write the blurb for it, which I did this afternoon.

Somehow I always find it a difficult task–sum up the whole novel in 150 words, and do it in such a way as to make someone want to open it up and read it. This always leaves me wondering if I should’ve kept it to 150 words in the first place.

Which brings me back some 30 years to my days as a horror novelist for a major New York City publishing house. They wouldn’t have dreamed of letting the book’s author write the cover blurb.

See that one up there? The cover copy on the back was written by someone who hadn’t read the book, or at best only skimmed a part of it. What you read on the back cover only slightly resembles the content of the book. I would have liked to complain, but that would’ve only made them laugh.

So Storehouse Press has me writing the cover copy for my own books, and the cover artist actually reads the book before he creates the cover, and everybody’s happy.

Next time you feel a book as given you a bum steer, please try to remember it’s probably not the author’s fault.