My Newswithviews Column, Oct. 29 (‘The Dems’ Deplorable Word’)

Image result for images of ruined city

“Looks like this riot was a little worse than the last one…”

Are they desperate enough to speak The Deplorable Word? Have they reached the point where, if they can’t rule America, they’ll try to destroy it?

Yeah, probably. They’re Democrats.

The Dems’ Deplorable Word

I have to admit I’m at a total loss to understand anyone who votes for the Riot Party and wants to give it power.

But we have less than a week to work on any undecided voters we might know.

We must not allow the Democrats to win. We’ll spend the rest of the century regretting it.

Democrats–and ‘The Deplorable Word’

Jadis | The Chronicles of Narnia Wiki | Fandom

(I’ve got to write a Newswithviews column today, and I guess I might as well go with this as my topic. But first let me see if I can make it go. Consider this a preview.)

In the Chronicle of Narnia called The Magician’s Nephew, by C.S. Lewis, we learn of a world called Charn where two queens once battled for supremacy. As she was about to lose the battle, Queen Jadis spoke a magic spell, The Deplorable Word, which wiped out every living thing on Charn.

It makes me wonder: are the Democrats getting desperate enough to speak their Deplorable Word? Like, “If we can’t rule America, then let there be no America!”

Look at their policy proposals. The Green New Deal, which would bankrupt the country and plunge its people into poverty. More lockdowns. A pledge to destroy the oil industry–which, if done, would leave us without the energy needed to sustain modern life. A scheme to pack the Supreme Court, thus removing any check on their power. Massive tax hikes. And the encouragement of riots and civil strife by insane Far Left groups like Black Lives Matter: nothing like a lot of terror and violence to make people obedient to the power.

The only way they could get any closer to a real Deplorable Word would be to promise, if elected, to start a worldwide nuclear war. They haven’t proposed that yet, but give them time. God only knows what they’ll do if they lose this election. They’ve erased almost all the “Stop” lines.

They are fast approaching the point where there is nothing they won’t do to gain power. Power to impose their socialist fantasies on 350 million people. Power to shred society.

They scare me, and I think they should scare you.

Back to Narnia

The Chronicles of Narnia, 7 Volumes: Full-Color Collector's Edition  -     By: C.S. Lewis
    Illustrated By: Pauline Baynes

Lately I’ve been bumping into quotes by C.S. Lewis in unexpected places. I took that as a sign that it was time for me to revisit his Chronicles of Narnia.

Aaah! That’s fine! The book we had is falling apart, so we ordered a boxed set (the one pictured above: you can find it at amazon, or Christianbooks.com) with colorized illustrations by Pauline Baynes. I was quite surprised by how heavy the box was, until I discovered the high quality of the books: strong, glossy paper.

But it’s what’s inside the books that counts. I’ve just finished The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, a parable in which the great Lion, Aslan, stands for Jesus Christ. I can’t imagine there’s anybody here who’s totally unfamiliar with these books. Suffice it to say that these are Christian books, truth brought out through fantasy, that are just as well-loved now as they were when they first came out in the 1950s. They have stood the test of time; and if our civilization survives, they’ll be part of it.

Really, you have no idea what a relief it is to put away the nooze and pick up a Narnia book. I’m in The Magician’s Nephew now, watching in delighted astonishment as Lewis uses a mere few words to mow down all the self-important self-anointed bogus intellectuals who ever lived. Gee, I originally typed that as “self-imported.” Now I think I ought to let it stand. Self-imported they certainly are.

I love these books, and they have inspired my own. If you haven’t read Narnia yet, there’s a treat in store for you.

‘C.S. Lewis and the Deplorable Word’ (2016)

See the source image

“If I can’t rule the world, then there won’t be a world!”

Having lived through two world wars, C.S. Lewis understood the temptations of nihilism and the rage of those who reached for absolute power but couldn’t grasp it. He wrote about it several times–in The Chronicles of Narnia and in That Hideous Strength are two examples that come to mind.

C.S. Lewis and The Deplorable Word

Go ahead–tell me we don’t have politicians and “leaders” today who’d just as soon destroy the world, if they’re not allowed to rule it.

But God won’t let them.

C.S. Lewis and The Deplorable Word

In the hall of Charn’s dead kings and queens, Queen Jadis returns to life. But she hasn’t learned her lesson.

For me, one of the most memorable scenes in C.S. Lewis’ Chronicles of Narnia occurs in The Magician’s Nephew when Digory and Polly travel to a world called Charn and find it completely dead. No blade of grass, no drop of water–all dead, all dust.

In the dead city of Charn they find a hall of perfectly preserved dead kings and queens of Charn. How did this happen?

Two queens, sisters, both of them incredibly powerful witches, battled each other to become the supreme ruler of all of Charn. There’s always someone who wants to become the Supreme Ruler of Bloody Everything. On the point of losing the war, Queen Jadis utters a spell, The Deplorable Word, which wipes out all life on Charn. Another spell, inadvertently activated by Digory, brings her back to life so she can go on to become the White Witch, supreme tyrant over Narnia, where she made it “always winter, but never Christmas.”

This was written in the 1950s, when fear of a world-destroying nuclear war was a new thing, and very real to many people. World War II was also fresh in memory. Can there be any doubt that Hitler, cornered in his bunker, would have spoken The Deplorable Word, if he’d had it?

When the Serpent seduced Eve with his “ye shall be as gods” snake-oil, he tapped into a fatal aspect of human nature that remains with us today–the desire to be, like God, supreme ruler over everything. But God has promised that honor to His Son, Jesus Christ; and instead of a Deplorable Word, God says, “Behold, I make all things new” (Revelation 21:5)–thus highlighting the difference between a righteous, loving God and sinful, fallen man.

The lust to rule the world is still with us, in spades–in the U.N., in Washington, D.C., in Brussels, in ISIS, among the Global Warming mob, and liberally strewn throughout the minds of intellectuals.

But God is with us, too, and His word shall prevail.

 

The Next Narnia Movie (Maybe): ‘The Magician’s Nephew’

First it was going to be The Silver Chair, but everything got shuffled around and now the next Narnia movie’s going to be The Magician’s Nephew–or so it seems ( http://teaser-trailer.com/the-magicians-nephew-movie/ ). Really, I just can’t keep track of it anymore. But they’ve got a movie poster ready for it, even though they can’t give us a release date. Not this year, and probably not next year, either.

Whoever is actually working on the movie now–guys, could you please get this one right?

(While you’re waiting for them to get it right, sit back and enjoy this rendition of the theme music from the BBC-TV Narnia productions of the 1980s–still the gold standard for bringing Narnia to the screen.)

The first three Chronicles of Narnia movies of the 21st century didn’t do all that well at the box office, and no one in Hollywood seems to know why. Allow me to enlighten them.

Yo, the movies underachieved because:

a) You guys kept messing around with the stories, and the changes you made were never for the better. Never.

b) You’re afraid of C.S. Lewis’ forthrightly Christian message, so you kept soft-pedaling Aslan, which was to miss the whole point of the stories.

c) You don’t seem to think your audience is capable of appreciating the stories as C.S. Lewis wrote them, so you keep trying to shape them to what you think is the taste of a dumbed-down, text-messaging, doofus audience.

Like many, many others, I want these movies to succeed; but so far the movie-makers have been their own worst enemy.

But we should be thankful they haven’t taken the books down with them.