Public School Cuisine

There are at least 10,000 reasons not to send your kids to public school, and here’s one of them–the food is awful ( http://eagnews.org/thanksmichelleobama-school-resumes-students-begin-posting-skimpy-lunches/ ).

Yep, the new menus suck every bit as much as last year’s. This is thanks to the 2010 Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act–honestly, if you were in Congress, would you dare vote against kiddies being healthy and hunger-free?–which gives Worst Lady Michelle Obama, whom no one voted for, a way to get involved in what other people’s children eat.

Bear in mind there is nothing intrinsically wrong with this food, and that it is a sin to waste it. The problem is, it’s just not food that any normal kid would eat. I wouldn’t choose to eat it, either. And when they give a big fat wing-ding at the White House, paid for by the hapless American public, you can bet your eyes they don’t serve any of this stuff.

When they’re not busy renaming major geographical features, cramming illegal aliens into the country, and making confetti of the Constitution, the pair in the White House like to poke their noses into everybody’s private business.

But don’t take my word for it. Click the link and see the pictures of what will confront America’s public school children when their summer furlough is over.

Would you eat it?


Prez Renames Mt. McKinley

No, I’m not pulling your leg. President *Batteries Not Included really has taken it upon himself to rename Mt. McKinley, the highest mountain in North America ( http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/obama-renames-nation%E2%80%99s-highest-mountain/ar-AAdLF9D?ocid=ansmsnnews11 ).

Who does he think he is?

It will now be Mt. Denali, a name by which many of the native peoples have called it for centuries. If that strikes you as only fair, please bear in mind that most of the geographical features in North America, natural and man-made, used to have names other than the ones they have today. Do you want to start changing all the names back to what they were 500 years ago?

Mt. McKinley was an easy target because it was named for a white male Republican. Had it been dubbed, say, Mt. Al Sharpton, or Mt. Margaret “Abortion Goddess” Sanger, or Mt. Dan “Mr. Homofascist” Savage, there is no way that name is going anywhere. But who was going to stand up for poor President McKinley?

It would be more productive and more just to start naming landfills and Superfund sites after our current national leaders. The Mitch McConnell Solid Waste Collection Site. The Hilary Clinton Toxic Waste Reservation. Enter at your own risk.

Because it won’t be so easy to get out.


Another Mystery of God’s Creation

“Lake guns” have been around for hundreds of years and we still haven’t figured out what causes them.

These are booming noises heard over bodies of water. In 1850 James Fenimore Cooper wrote a story, “The Lake Gun,” about the mysterious boomings heard over Seneca Lake in upstate New York. But the lake guns are known from all over the world, under a variety of names.

Among the causes proposed are mini-earthquakes, sonic booms, methane gas, ghosts, UFOs, meteorites… and none of them stands up to investigation. The simple fact is, nobody knows what causes lake guns.

My wife and I used to hear them occasionally, over Barnegat Bay. The water always seemed to be unusually calm when the lake guns spoke. Elsewhere, they can be loud enough to move alarmed residents to call police.

We don’t know what they are. They’re cool, they’re a little bit scary, and we don’t know what makes them go boom.

Unraveling all the mysteries of God’s physical creation is a task that will keep us occupied for as long as human beings are on earth. We don’t know–apart from what the Bible teaches us–how non-living matter can acquire life. We don’t know how many species of insects there are.

But we do know that Jesus Christ is Lord–Lord over all we know, and Lord over all we don’t know. As we inquire into the mysteries of creation, let us remember whose creation it is.


Hymn: ‘Holy, Holy, Holy’

I’m not altogether comfortable with the fancy setting, but this hymn needs a big, powerful organ, and an enthusiastic choir, to do it justice.

This was a favorite in the church I grew up in, whose building still exists, but the spirit is gone out of it.

The imagery of the hymn’s second verse is from Chapter 4 of Revelation.

And as I recall it, the term “Blessed Deity,” used here, was originally “Blessed Trinity.” Don’t ask me why anyone would change it.


Comic Relief from Allen Sherman

A lot of you are too young to remember this guy, but he was a riot. Here’s one of his major hits, “Hello, Mudda, Hello, Fadda” from 1963.

I don’t know about you, but I can use a laugh.


‘A Demon in My View’ by Ruth Rendell (Was She Drawing a Map of Hell?)

Ruth Rendell, one of the most prolific, successful, and critically acclaimed mystery writers ever, died in May of this year. She worked to the end, publishing her last novels in 2014 and 2015.

A Demon in My View came out in 1976 and promptly won a Gold Dagger Award. It was made into a movie in 1992, starring Anthony Hopkins, and I have just re-read the novel after a lapse of several decades. You know you’re getting old when you toss the word “decades” around like that.

I have read some of Ruth Rendell’s most recent works. When I do, I always wind up asking myself, “Why in the world am I reading this? It’s just a story of horrible people doing horrible things, no glimmer of redemption anywhere, just life that is nasty, brutish, and terribly stupid…”

In A Demon in My View, Rendell explored the mind of a psychopathic killer hiding in plain sight among “normal” people. The killer has found a safe way to satisfy his urge to kill women without actually killing or even hurting anybody. But the whole system is innocently and unknowingly upset by a new neighbor, and a catastrophe becomes inevitable.

Ruth Rendell was a great mystery writer with a true gift for piling up suspense. What interested her was not so much the mystery, but the psychology of the characters involved in it. Occasionally she wrote a mystery in which we know from the start “whodunit,” and the story goes on to explore how and why the murder was done.

Throughout her career she wrote about persons who do evil things. But they did them in a certain social context. Much of her focus was on the British working class and under-class, but she sometimes visited the upper crust.

What I get in A Demon in My View, and in the works of Ruth Rendell in general (most of which I have read), is something which my wife calls a kind of photograph of British society and culture, but which I am coming to think of as a map of the British portion of Hell–which is probably not too different from any other nation’s neighborhood.

In some 40 years’ worth of fiction, I find depicted a society in which Christian faith is almost totally extinct; there is no sense of sin, no shame, hardly any awareness that the word “sin” means anything; and there is a code of conduct which boils down to a mere two questions–“Will it make me feel good?” and “Will I get away with it?”

Well, okay, if you’re going to write about murderers, you’ve got to give them a few psychological quirks because there must be something in them that makes them murderers. But in Rendell’s fiction, I find it hard to understand why everybody is not a murderer. There is almost no morality to restrain anyone from doing anything. And nobody feels guilty about lying, cheating, stealing, or committing adultery because they have no sense that any of these behaviors is wrong, and worthy of condemnation. (In the later novels, characters do feel guilty when they let slip a remark that is not Politically Correct. I pray that is not the beginning and end of the role of the personal conscience in the UK today.)

Not that I feel there is any danger of Ruth Rendell leading me into a moral No Man’s Land. I think it fair to say that she is not advocating, but trying to reproduce what she sees. Throughout her career she has been very, very careful not to say anything by way of judgment. If she judged what she saw, she kept it to herself. I am told that she finally revealed something of her true feelings in a 2014 novel which I haven’t read yet. But in everything else I’ve read, Rendell got out of the way and simply let you see the picture.

It’s not a pretty picture.

I don’t think it hurts Christians to know what we’re up against, culturally.

It should inspire us to earnest prayer.


Welcom Back to Collidge, Now Shut Up

Its almost time for the new semester to start, and ther wil be lots of new studints on our campas. I has ben here all sumer, workin on my degre in Gender Studies.

That stopid guy had to go to dentist, so I got his blog, ha-ha.

Lots of peple ben complaning about no freedem of speetch in collidge anymore. Well, ther aint suposed to be no freedem!!! What kind of big dumby thinks you can oaught to be alowed to say wrong things?

You freshmen who is coming in, yuo shuld pay attenttion to yuor Studnt Guide and just not say anything. Only us interllecturals shuld auht to be alowed to say things, because we never say nothing that is hatful or wrong or stopid. The rest of yiu is not interllecturels yet so you shuld just shut up. Yous dont know how to talk without sayin things that is microgresion. (I am not sure abuot that word, I only lernt it the other day. My prefesser he says its microgresion when you say or do somthing that is ofensieve even when yuo dont meane it. He says you cant hardly say nothing withhout being microgrestive.)

Well I got to go now, ther is a lectur on a bortion how it keeps wimmin helthy, and how we got to defiend Planed Parinthood from the  Vaste Rihjtwing Conspracy, and after that I got class in Self-Esteem. So rembember, if yuo aint a interllectural, just shut up and dont say nothing. Thats yuor cyvic dutie!!!


What a Send-off!

The above video was taken at the funeral of a teacher at a boys’ school in New Zealand. All that yelling and stomping is called a “haka”–a uniquely New Zealand way of paying tribute to a person or an occasion. It was invented by the Maoris, a Polynesian people who discovered and settled New Zealand a few centuries before Captain Cook discovered it. As you can see from the video, the haka now belongs to all New Zealanders regardless of race.

I don’t know about you, but this gave me goosebumps and almost made me cry. I find it profoundly moving. This is a send-off worthy of a great chief–or a beloved and respected teacher. I think King Ryons’ army sounds like this when it’s on the march and singing its anthem, His Mercy Endureth Forever, in a dozen different languages at once.

There will be Christians who will say, “But this is a pagan custom! Wholly unsuitable for Christians!”

Fah! Have they never heard of common grace? Do they not know that out of one blood God created all the peoples of the earth? If pagans do not know God, nevertheless, as St. Paul taught the Athenians, God knows them: and God is at all times as near to them as He is near to us. So of course pagans can create beautiful, stirring music, and other fine things–because they themselves are created in the image of God.

So, yeah, you bet–the haka is entirely suitable for Christians.

But it ought to be saved for special occasions.


Eat Lots of Cake and Still Lose Weight!

I have to go to the dentist this morning and I have no idea what will happen to me there. So I thought I’d better post something now, in case I’m not able to, later.

Meanwhile, I have a burning question:

Where has my readership gone?

In the middle of the month, the readership of this blog took a radical nose-dive and has not come back. Where is everybody? Like, I’m sitting here listening to crickets.

Was it something I said?


University: ‘No Such Thing as Free Speech’

tape over mouth photo: tape-over-mouth tape-over-mouth.jpg

I just told you about Santa Clara University teaching kids to call 911 every time somebody hurts their feelings–but please don’t think such foolishness is confined to California.

Let’s zip across the continent to the opposite coast, to New Jersey–to my own alma mater, Rutgers University.

You know what Rutgers is telling its students? Hey, let’s quote from the student handbook:

“There is no such thing as ‘free’ speech.” Therefore, warns the Office of Student
Affairs, you’d better “think before you speak.” ( http://rare.us/story/rutgers-tells-students-there-is-no-such-thing-as-free-speech/ )

Hello? Hello? Is anybody home? Did they relocate Rutgers to North Korea, or bring North Korea to Rutgers?

The handbook also exhorts students to “Join activities, programs, courses, and practices that promote diversity”–by enforcing uniformity of thought–“and social justice.”

Bias incidents are forbidden, and here’s how Rutgers defines a bias act:

“Bias Acts Are: Verbal, written, physical, psychological acts–” in other words, any action at all, short of dying, which they haven’t yet figured out how to punish–“that threaten or harm a person or group on the  basis of race, religion, color, sex, age, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression…” Can I stop now? This goes on for quite a bit longer.

When I went to Rutgers, 1967-71, “dissent” was lauded as an end in itself, “dissenters” placed on pedestals, we were all urged to become dissenters, etc. Of course, what they wanted was for students to oppose the Viet Nam War. If you dissented in favor of the war, that was another story.

Wait’ll the next time these yo-yos call me up to ask for money. “Sorry, but I don’t contribute to silly-bugger institutions that promote Stalinism.” And go ahead, I dare you to stay on the line.


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