‘The Oldest Bird?’ (2018)

Image result for protoavis

A scientist can get his colleagues pretty mad if he discovers something that’s not supposed to be there.

Sankar Chatterjee accomplished this by digging up a fossil bird that he says lived alongside the first dinosaurs. Uh-oh.

The Oldest Bird?

So much in “science” is said with such authority! As if they really, truly knew. Maybe Protoavis was a bird, and maybe it wasn’t. But “maybe” doesn’t pull in many grants, and certainly won’t land you any PBS specials.

What if there wasn’t really any Triassic Period, after all?

I’d better watch out, saying things like that…

Largest Mammal Ever?

Paraceratherium linxiaense giant rhinos in the Linxia Basin

 

Paleontologists working in China have found the fossils of a giant rhinoceros that may well have been the largest land mammal ever–16 feet high at the shoulder, 26 feet long, and weighing in at 24 tons (https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/scientists-found-ancient-fossilized-rhino-144318178.html).

They’re calling it a Paraceratherium, but I prefer the old name, Baluchitherium. Roy Chapman Andrews found one during his Gobi Desert expeditions in the 1920s. Specimens have also been found throughout Asia, with hints its range may have reached into eastern Europe. (Some call it the Indricothere. This can get confusing.)

This one’s four times the size of a full-grown elephant, and supposedly lived some 26 million years ago. Some of you won’t be buying that, but let it go for now. Whatever its age, there it is–a hornless rhino like a walking building.

I’ve always loved this creature. This is the great beast King Ryons rode to the rescue of the city of Obann.

The Thunder King (Bell Mountain, 3) - Kindle edition by Duigon, Lee. Religion & Spirituality Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.

Can you imagine seeing one of these? It was as big as a fair-sized dinosaur. There must be a limit to how big a mammal can grow–but have we seen that limit yet?

Rejoice in the works of the Lord!

My Newswithviews Column, Dec. 24 (‘Did We See… a Pterodactyl?’)

See the source image

I don’t know about you, but I needed a break from politics. After all, it’s Christmas.

So I wrote about our pterodactyl. I’m sure I’m the only Newswithviews columnist who’s seen a pterodactyl.

Did We See a… Pterodactyl?

Yes, I know, the libs will jump all over it. “See? See? We toldja he was crazy!” But as Lou Costello once said, I saw what I saw when I saw it–and I don’t care what a bunch of leftids think. They believe in much more ridiculous things than the occasional pterodactyl. I prefer not to mention any of them here.

P.S.–Don’t forget out cyber-Christmas party! All are welcome! Bring imaginary snacks and board games and party fixin’s. We’re going to have a blast!

‘Did We See a Pterodactyl?’ (2017)

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If you make a habit of looking up at the sky, you’ll see some pretty strange things.

Like this.

Did We See a Pterodactyl?

So was it a pterodactyl? Really? In Holmdel Township, New Jersey? How could that possibly be so?

But that’s what it looked like. That’s the only think it looked like.

Mr. Nature: The Mastodon

The Fall of the Carnivorous Mastodon | WIRED

My wife was watching a video about mastodons when I came in from smoking my cigar and doing a crossword puzzle, and it moved me to seek out pictures of this wonderful prehistoric animal.

Jambo! from Mr. Nature. Our safari today takes us nowhere, geographically; but it does take us back in time, to visit with America’s native elephant genus, the mastodon. We are told it was hunted out of existence, by America’s first modern humans, some ten thousand years ago. Take that for what it’s worth: all we know for sure is that there are no more mastodons.

I often wonder–shall we ever see these creatures? They are part of God’s creation, and He has the entire universe at his disposal. In the restoration of all things, will the mastodon be restored, too?

I like to think so.

‘Nother Experiment

Moschops - Wikipedia

It probably doesn’t show at your end, but here at mine, I’m trying to master new techniques that have been imposed on me without my consent. There’s a lot of that going around lately.

If this post is successfully published, you will see a Moschops, from South Africa, and the silhouette of an unidentified woman who is taking it for a walk. You can try to decide which animal was weirder, this or Tanystropheus. The latter enjoys a cameo appearance in Bell Mountain No. 13, The Wind from Heaven. Moschops last appeared, fleetingly, in The Missouri Breaks with Marlon Brando.

If the post is unsuccessful, you’ll probably see nothing at all.

Back to Work, at Last

I haven’t seen this animal in Obann yet–Doedecurus, a giant South American armadillo with a tail club. But I suspect it’s only a matter of time before one or more of them turns up.

Finally! I sat outside and wrote a scene in my new book–which has only just started, and only God knows where the story’s going to take me. Indeed, after I post this, I think I’ll go back and write some more.

Hot tip heard on the radio this morning:

Want to keep your face mask/badge of submission disinfected? Nothing could be easier. Just leave it in your car (I’ve hung mine from the rearview mirror) and let the intense heat that builds up in there kill the germs. Be sure to shut your windows.

And now, back to Obann City for Lord Chutt’s treason trial.

‘A Live Woolly Mammoth’? (2016)

I just can’t make up my mind about the video included in this post. Is it real? But no, it can’t be. There are no more mammoths–not even in Siberia.

A Live Woolly Mammoth?

Siberia’s a big place, though. And we know now (or at least are pretty sure we know) that there were still mammoths living on Wrangel Island while the Egyptians were building the pyramids.

I would like there to be mammoths still. Somewhere.

Battling Beasties

Just in case you were wondering what Entelodonts were like when they got riled up, this video will give you a pretty good idea of it.

The special effects are by Tim Haines, whose work has inspired more than a few scenes in my own Bell Mountain books.

As an added bonus, we’ve thrown in a Baluchitherium.

 

‘Jandra’s Nasty Toothed Bird’ (2016)

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If you’ve read much of my Bell Mountain series, you’ll know that Jandra is the toddler prophetess through whom God spoke to make Ryons a king. And you’ll know that, wherever she goes, she has a hissing toothed bird that follows her around.

Many readers wished to see that bird. The enclosed video was about the closest thing I could find to it. (And look at this! Mr. Genius has just erased the video accidentally, as he was trying to post it. Well, let me see if I can get it back… Got it!)

Jandra’s Nasty Toothed Bird

Feel free to completely ignore the evolution fairy tale that comes with the video.