‘The Pretensions of Man’ (Mark Rushdoony)

Mark Rushdoony, 'The Sweep of History' – Lee Duigon

In this month’s Chalcedon blog post, Mark Rushdoony reflects on people playing God: they’re in over their heads.

https://chalcedon.edu/blog/the-pretentions-of-men

Mark and I are close enough in age that we can both remember “air raid drills”–in case of an atomic bomb dropping on your school, “duck and cover” under your desk or get down to the basement hallway. Now it’s Systemic Racism and Climbit Change. “If men do not have an imminent threat to fear,” he writes, “they will find one.” And it’s very much a case of seek and ye shall find: no one ever comes home empty-handed from a search for The End O’ The World.

Finite creatures as we are, we’ll never fully understand anything God does. It’s why we need faith. We see the ungodly and the wicked running wild, intending to “transform” our country into a socialist hell-hole… and there is just no way we understand why God doesn’t just wipe them off the table.

Have faith.

It’s indispensable.

‘The Long-Term Necessity of Building the Kingdom’

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This is a timely Chalcedon blog piece from Mark Rushdoony. Very timely!

https://chalcedon.edu/blog/the-long-term-necessity-of-building-the-kingdom

We try to solve the world’s problems with worldly solutions; but we–and our sin–are the source of all the problems. That’s why they can’t be fixed from the outside. As long as we insist on doing things our way instead of God’s, Mark writes, “everything will go wrong.” As it’s been this year, so far.

“Until we build the Kingdom, first of all in ourselves [emphasis added], nothing will go right.”

Something to think about–deeply.

‘A Walking Law’ (Chalcedon Blog, Sept. 28)

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If the people are lawless at heart, you can station a policeman on every street corner and you’ll still have crime.

This is why God has devised a new covenant to be written on our hearts and lived out in the world–for everyone to see.

https://chalcedon.edu/blog/a-walking-law

The problem with the Old Covenant was that God’s people couldn’t keep it. Again and again they rallied back around the law, and again and again they fell away from it. So God made a better covenant, and sent His Son to establish it. A covenant of grace. A covenant of the law written not on tables of stone, but on our hearts.

Do God’s laws and God’s grace clash with each other? St. Paul has answered that question.

“Do we then make void the law through faith? God forbid: yea, we establish the law” (Romans 3:31)

 

‘Schooling vs. Education’

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This insightful piece by Andrea Schwartz appeared in 2010 in the Chalcedon Blog.

https://chalcedon.edu/blog/schooling-vs-education

Think about it: you knock yourself out to give your child a good, solid homeschooled education… and then you send him off to “college”? Plug him into “the artificial environment of college,” with peer pressure and arrogant left-wing professors taking the place of family and church? “To funnel these bright, homeschooled graduates into the modern education system makes little sense,” Andrea writes.

Even in 2010, nine years ago, there were good alternatives to a public college “education.” Today there are even more.

Homeschooling is a key to re-Christianizing America and saving it from dumbed-down socialism. Don’t abandon it just because your kid turns 18.

Kill public education, and Far Left Crazy dies.

‘As Bright as the Promises of God’

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I seem to be doing an awful lot of Bible stuff today. Well, when’s a bad time for that?

This heartening essay is by Mark Rushdoony for today’s Chalcedon Blog:

https://chalcedon.edu/blog/as-bright-as-the-promises-of-god

We are not just to believe God’s promises, Mark writes, not just to refrain from doubting them, but “to live in terms of their certainty” and “to live and act in faithfulness to the certainty that He will accomplish it.”

That’s what makes them certainty: He, not we, will accomplish it.

But He does like it when we work with Him.

‘Cherry-Picking at Our Peril’

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In the Ancient Near East, there was no universally-accepted calendar. The same kinds of “discrepancies” are found in every kingdom’s annals.

In this April 30 Chalcedon blog post, Mark Rushdoony tackles the question of whether the Bible is accurate as to matters of historical fact.

https://chalcedon.edu/blog/cherry-picking-at-our-peril

Critics like to point to supposed “discrepancies” within the Bible: for example, when it comes to stating how many years were in the reign of a king of Israel or Judah. At that point in world history, there was no widely-accepted standard of timekeeping, no universal calendar. Nor, within the same kingdom, was there any agreement as to when a king’s reign actually began or ended. So naturally the numbers will differ, here and there.

The point is, the Bible is 100% reliable and, as the Word of God, 100% authoritative–even when we can’t understand some of the historical details.

If your faith stands or falls by how well the numbers tally in Kings and Chronicles, there’s not much to it.

“No Weapon Formed Against Thee Shall Prosper”

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Esther and the Persian king

One of the hardest lessons for us to learn, in such an evil and confusing age as this, is how to walk by faith and not by sight: because if we walk only by sight, most of what we see is bad. Mark Rushdoony discussed this in his blog post yesterday.

https://chalcedon.edu/blog/no-weapon-that-is-formed-against-thee-shall-prosper

The Book of Esther, in which the name of God does not appear, shows how God governs history, intervening at need. Our God created us with free will and respects it, even when our will is bent to evil: but he will not let evil prosper in the long run. As Isaiah said, “No weapon formed against thee shall prosper” (Is. 54:17).

How many times would God’s people have been wiped off the face of the earth, had He not intervened? As history, the Bible offers many examples of this truth.

And we do well to learn them.

‘A Rising Tide of Faithful Believers’

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Pastor Wang Yi… in bonds for Christ

In this recent Chalcedon Blog post, Mark Rushdoony introduces us to a modern-day hero of the Church–Pastor Wang Yi, imprisoned in China since Dec. 9 for his stand against rampant statism.

https://chalcedon.edu/blog/a-rising-tide-of-faithful-believers

Pastor Wang is different because he refuses to criticize other Christians, or even to defend himself against their jabs at him. The battle, Rev. Rushdoony reminds us, is against “forces of ungodliness, not other believers.”

Not always easy to remember, is it?

Rushdoony on Socialism

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Dead, but still a threat to freedom

R.J. Rushdoony’s essay on “Socialism as a Perpetual Civil War” was published as a Chalcedon blog post in 2009. Actually it was written quite a few years before that: but its insights are right on target today.

https://chalcedon.edu/blog/socialism-as-a-perpetual-civil-war

Rushdoony points out that socialism has its own “infallibility concept” which explains away its multitudinous and incessant failure. It destroys wealth and inhibits wealth’s creation. When anything goes wrong, it finds a scapegoat. When an epidemic struck Red China in 1967, the government threatened to purge the doctors who had “ignored Mao’s health policies”–as if medical doctors knew less about health than some crazy old mass murderer.

It’s looking more and more like we’re headed for a showdown between Christ’s Kingdom and humanist man’s impoverished socialist pipe dream.

And that’s a fight we’d better win.

‘What Makes Us Different’

“Come Ye Sinners” (Norton Hall Band): Andrea has provided the lyrics in her blog post.

By Andrea Schwartz on the Chalcedon blog, “What Makes Us Different” reminds us that the fallen world hates Christ and hates Christians and Christianity–and it doesn’t matter!

https://chalcedon.edu/blog/what-makes-us-different

Only Christianity offers healing and forgiveness to sinners–and we’re all sinners. We don’t have to scramble to rack up good works, only to fall short by one or two. Jesus Christ has paid our bill: paid it on the cross, paid in full.