The Killer Birds of Obann

We’ve borrowed a little footage from Tim Haines’ Walking with Beasts so you can see the kind of killer birds that stalk the plains of Obann. These are big! It’s no exaggeration to say one of them could kill and eat a grown man.

Once upon a time these birds were all over South America, dozens of different species, some of which eventually wandered into North America. We don’t know why they went extinct. Maybe SUVs killed ’em. Or Income Inequality. Or Donald Trump’s kids shot ’em.

But you can still find them in Obann, in my Bell Mountain books–along with a lot of other cool critters. Some of the people are a lot more dangerous than the big birds; read the books and see for yourself.

Click “Books” on the home page for lots more information.

‘Going Godless All the Way’ (2017)

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I get edgy whenever I hear anyone speak of “our entertainment needs.” Stories around the campfire are one thing. Lavishly-produced celebrations of atheism are another.

Going Godless All the Way

I enjoy Primeval because Tim Haines’ special effects are the closest I’ll ever come to seeing live prehistoric animals. (How could he have left out Uintatherium? They always leave out Uintatherium!) But the price of admission is to let the screenwriters write out God.

We have to start winning back cultural ground for Christ’s Kingdom. We’ve let it go for too long.

 

 

Battling Beasties

Just in case you were wondering what Entelodonts were like when they got riled up, this video will give you a pretty good idea of it.

The special effects are by Tim Haines, whose work has inspired more than a few scenes in my own Bell Mountain books.

As an added bonus, we’ve thrown in a Baluchitherium.

 

‘The Death Dog fron “The Thunder King”‘ (2016)

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You need a place to hide, if you’re gonna see this.

This is the creature King Ryons and Cavall encountered on the plains in The Thunder King (No. 3 in the Bell Mountain series). No one had ever seen one before, and lived to tell about it. Ryons called it the Death Dog.

The Death Dog from ‘The Thunder King’

The video is from Tim Haines’ TV special, Walking With Prehistoric Beasts. He re-created the extinct Hyaenodon as a super-predator, and inspired this scene in my book.

For more information on all the books in the series, just go to the home page and click “Books.”

‘When Monsters Attack Your School’ (2016)

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Thanks to the special effects magic of Tim Haines, we can see what happens when an oversized Gorgonopsian from the Triassic period… decides to break into a grammar school and eat people.

When Monsters Attack Your School…

(Technical note: They were ugly critters, but they were nowhere near that big.)

This is only slightly worse than stuff that goes on in public schools every single day. “Gender spectrum,” anyone? We can’t do anything about disasters involving imaginary prehistoric animals.

But we can and by all means should pull children out of schools run by Far Left Crazy teachers’ unions.

Bonus Critter Video

Having just plowed my way through another Newswithviews column, I felt an urge to celebrate.

The prehistoric mammals in this video–you may want to turn down the appalling background music; I don’t know what they were thinking–are the work of Tim Haines, most of them appearing in his wonderful Walking With Beasts.

And most of them have turned up in my Bell Mountain books, too! If you’ve read the books, have a little fun by seeing how many of these critters you can remember from the books.

And I’m off for a bike ride!

Oh, Boy! Knuckle-Bear Video!

For no reason at all, everything here is working again. Thank you, Lord!

Okay–yesterday there was nothing green on any of the trees; and today there is, some leaves have budded. Spring is definitely here. And how do they do that without anyone noticing until afterward?

In a matter of weeks it’ll be time to start writing again, back to Obann to try to clean up the mess I left at the end of His Mercy Endureth Forever. I haven’t got the seed of the story yet: I have to wait on the Lord to give it to me. A nerve-wracking procedure sometimes, but it’s gotten me through twelve books.

Meanwhile, dear readers, finally I have some video of chalicotheres, the “knuckle-bears” that live on the edge of Lintum Forest. It comes from the BBC and Tim Haines’ “Walking with Beasts,” a source of inspiration to me despite its bent for Darwinian fairy tales. What can I say? The beasts are cool!

The video includes a shocking cameo appearance by a hyaenodon, aka the “death dog” that would’ve gulped down both Ryons and Cavall if he hadn’t been interrupted by–but I don’t want to spoil the story.

The Baddest Beast in Lintum Forest

This animal is so rare, neither Lintum Foresters nor Abnak hunters have as yet found a name for it. Jack and Ellayne, in Bell Mountain, saw one making off with half a knuckle-bear in its jaws.

The Andrewsarchus, shown here from Tim Haines’ Walking With Beasts, is known from just a single skull discovered in Mongolia by Roy Chapman Andrews’ Central Asiatic Expedition. From the neck down, everything else is pure conjecture. Not having read Bell Mountain, scientists still haven’t decided quite how to reconstruct this monster. If you ever get a chance to visit the American Museum of Natural History in New York, don’t miss the Andrewsarchus skull. It’s a yard long, and those massive teeth and muscle attachments look like they mean business.

‘The Temptation’: Finished!

There may not be many more nice days where these past two came from, so I really buckled down to try to finish Bell Mountain No. 11, The Temptation, before the cold weather set in. Scribble, scribble, hour by hour–and now it’s finished. I think.

The climax of the story, this time, wasn’t a big surprise for me: events pretty much dictated it. But for artistic effect, I think it’s all I could have hoped for. I say “I think” because I won’t really know until I get it all typed up and my wife and my editor can read it. They’ll tell me if I’ve hit the target which God gave me.

Meanwhile, folks, enjoy this Walking With Beasts trailer, featuring Tim Haines’ speculative re-creations of assorted prehistoric mammals. Some of these critters are featured in my books. I find God’s handiwork a constant source of inspiration.

Biggest Mammal Carnivore Ever?

In 1923 a member of Roy Chapman Andrews’ expedition to the Gobi Desert found a yard-long skull that scientists thought belonged to the largest land-dwelling carnivorous mammal ever–Andrewsarchus, named for RCA himself. Since then, no other Andrewsarchus fossils have been found.

I’ve seen this skull in the America Museum of Natural History. It’s a whopper. The muscle attachments are simply huge, indicating a bite of tremendous power. The teeth do look like a carnivore’s teeth, but they also look kind of dull and worn. Based on comparisons to fossils that looked similar, paleontologists reconstructed this awesome beast that had little hooves instead of claws and must have weighed upwards of a ton.

But, despite the wonderful special effects wizardry of Tim Haines, it’s all just speculation. Well, when you see that skull, you can’t help speculating.

I’ve got to work this critter into one of my books, somewhere along the line. Maybe it could eat a villain.